Citation

Identities from Shao-Lin: Identity and Culture in 1970’s Hong Kong Kung Fu Genre Movies

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Abstract:

In the 1970’s, the Hong Kong cinema industry exploded internationally with the popularity of the “kung fu craze”. The kung fu genre, particularly as crafted by the Shaw Brothers Studio, often featured macho protagonists, blood-drenched violence and gritty, historical based plot lines. One of the most popular plot settings for the Shaw Brothers kung fu movies of the 1970’s was the legend of the sacking of the Shaolin Temple by the Qing military. Underneath the violence and martial arts spectacle of the kung fu movies, particularly the ones dealing with the Shaolin Temple, lies a set of themes which deal with formative identity experiences: betrayal, exile, loss of loved ones, rise of a new generation. The rise of the kung fu genre came at a time when Hong Kong itself was finding a new expression of identity. Hong Kong in the mid-20th Century had been greatly influenced by troubles on the mainland and the massive influx of immigrants into the territory. By 1971, the population of Hong Kong was pushing the four million mark with roughly half the population under the age of 25. This marked the rise of a massive Hong Kong generation that hadn’t come there as immigrants, but were born as part of Hong Kong. This paper seeks to show that the rise of the kung fu genre, with its specific themes, grew concurrently with the rise of a new Hong Kong culture coming into the 1970’s. There will be an analysis of the themes, production and individuals involved in the kung fu movies and how they influenced and were reflective of the Hong Kong of the 1970’s.
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Association:
Name: Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference
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http://www.asian-studies.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1188457_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Denman, Michael. "Identities from Shao-Lin: Identity and Culture in 1970’s Hong Kong Kung Fu Genre Movies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2017-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1188457_index.html>

APA Citation:

Denman, M. "Identities from Shao-Lin: Identity and Culture in 1970’s Hong Kong Kung Fu Genre Movies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada <Not Available>. 2017-07-22 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1188457_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In the 1970’s, the Hong Kong cinema industry exploded internationally with the popularity of the “kung fu craze”. The kung fu genre, particularly as crafted by the Shaw Brothers Studio, often featured macho protagonists, blood-drenched violence and gritty, historical based plot lines. One of the most popular plot settings for the Shaw Brothers kung fu movies of the 1970’s was the legend of the sacking of the Shaolin Temple by the Qing military. Underneath the violence and martial arts spectacle of the kung fu movies, particularly the ones dealing with the Shaolin Temple, lies a set of themes which deal with formative identity experiences: betrayal, exile, loss of loved ones, rise of a new generation. The rise of the kung fu genre came at a time when Hong Kong itself was finding a new expression of identity. Hong Kong in the mid-20th Century had been greatly influenced by troubles on the mainland and the massive influx of immigrants into the territory. By 1971, the population of Hong Kong was pushing the four million mark with roughly half the population under the age of 25. This marked the rise of a massive Hong Kong generation that hadn’t come there as immigrants, but were born as part of Hong Kong. This paper seeks to show that the rise of the kung fu genre, with its specific themes, grew concurrently with the rise of a new Hong Kong culture coming into the 1970’s. There will be an analysis of the themes, production and individuals involved in the kung fu movies and how they influenced and were reflective of the Hong Kong of the 1970’s.


Similar Titles:
Producing in Hong Kong, Consuming in China: Cultural Identities and Comics Production

On Speaking (up for) Cantonese as Hong Kong Cultural Identity

Political Implications of Cultural Identities of Hong Kong Journalists: Two Survey Studies in 2006 and 2011

The Undercover Genre in Hong Kong Cinema: The 1997 Handover and Hong Kong Identity


 
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