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Focusing faculty on key concerns: using a primary-trait rubric to evaluate student drug posters

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Abstract:

Objective/Intent: To introduce a methodologically-sound assessment tool/rubric to reduce faculty-evaluator variability in assessing student-developed drug posters. Application of Informatics is a project-based course that serves to build on the drug information and informatics concepts covered in Professional Practice I-Informatics, which is taught in the first quarter of the first professional year. Students are placed in small groups, are assigned a recently FDA-approved drug, and research the product and its literature in order to create a professional drug poster for delivery. Each year, faculty are asked to evaluate the group drug posters; these evaluations account for 75% of the final course grade. In previous years, a more subjective faculty evaluation form was used causing dramatic grader variability. Methods/Process: In developing the new rubric evaluation tool, cues were taken from the previous evaluation tool and from “best practices” established in the literature. For example, several evaluation categories were maintained (organization, content, delivery, questions and answers). Rather than applying arbitrary points that lacked guidance, the rubric was designed to provide concrete exceptions for an excellent, good, fair, and poor group performance. Results/Outcomes: Use of the new rubric tool provided more discriminating and constructive evaluations of student group performances. Implications: Future informatics courses will utilize the rubric evaluation tool and further refinement will occur. Additionally, primary-trait rubric assessment tools, such as this one, transfer with minimal modification to a range of verbal and written student projects.
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Association:
Name: American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
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http://www.aacp.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p119125_index.html
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MLA Citation:

McKeever, Andrea. and Hobson, Eric. "Focusing faculty on key concerns: using a primary-trait rubric to evaluate student drug posters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, California, USA, Jul 05, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p119125_index.html>

APA Citation:

McKeever, A. L. and Hobson, E. H. , 2006-07-05 "Focusing faculty on key concerns: using a primary-trait rubric to evaluate student drug posters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, San Diego, California, USA <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p119125_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Objective/Intent: To introduce a methodologically-sound assessment tool/rubric to reduce faculty-evaluator variability in assessing student-developed drug posters. Application of Informatics is a project-based course that serves to build on the drug information and informatics concepts covered in Professional Practice I-Informatics, which is taught in the first quarter of the first professional year. Students are placed in small groups, are assigned a recently FDA-approved drug, and research the product and its literature in order to create a professional drug poster for delivery. Each year, faculty are asked to evaluate the group drug posters; these evaluations account for 75% of the final course grade. In previous years, a more subjective faculty evaluation form was used causing dramatic grader variability. Methods/Process: In developing the new rubric evaluation tool, cues were taken from the previous evaluation tool and from “best practices” established in the literature. For example, several evaluation categories were maintained (organization, content, delivery, questions and answers). Rather than applying arbitrary points that lacked guidance, the rubric was designed to provide concrete exceptions for an excellent, good, fair, and poor group performance. Results/Outcomes: Use of the new rubric tool provided more discriminating and constructive evaluations of student group performances. Implications: Future informatics courses will utilize the rubric evaluation tool and further refinement will occur. Additionally, primary-trait rubric assessment tools, such as this one, transfer with minimal modification to a range of verbal and written student projects.

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