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Does In-Group Religious Priming Decrease Negative Out-group Attitudes of Majority Group Members?

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Abstract:

When do majority groups endorse negative attitudes toward minority members, and what factors are involved in these perceptions? Studies have revealed that priming of religious concepts induced pro-social behaviors, but also increased prejudice towards minorities. Yet, more empirical research on how various religious groups traverse their social world, particularly in their interactions with minority group members, is needed. The present research extends the use of visual cognitive priming to the context of social and group differences by examining how supraliminal and subliminal priming of religious symbols affect out-group attitudes.
Three experiments examined the influence of religious concepts on prejudices and threat perceptions of Jews towards Muslims. In Study 1, students completed a search puzzle by which they were exposed to out-group, in-group or neutral religious symbols, and filled questionnaires assessing their out-group attitudes. Priming did not affect attitudes. In Study 2 subliminal priming was employed. It was found that subliminal exposure to Jewish in-group religious concepts reduced negative attitudes towards Muslims, as reflected by measures of prejudice, social distance, realistic and symbolic threat perceptions. Inter-group anxiety, however, was not affected by priming. In Study 3, comparable supraliminal and subliminal priming techniques were employed and it was confirmed that only for the in-group religious concept condition subliminal primes reduced the majority's negative attitudes towards Muslims relative to supraliminal primes.
We suggest the important role of religious content in contributing to intergroup attitude formation. Moreover, the findings highlight the role that religion plays in social-cognitive structures mainly in political intergroup conflict.

Author's Keywords:

Priming, Religion, Out-group, Attitudes, Minority/Majority
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Association:
Name: Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology
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http://ispp.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1243652_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Shamoa-Nir, Lipaz. and Rzpurker-Apfeld, Irene. "Does In-Group Religious Priming Decrease Negative Out-group Attitudes of Majority Group Members?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K., Jun 29, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1243652_index.html>

APA Citation:

Shamoa-Nir, L. and Rzpurker-Apfeld, I. , 2017-06-29 "Does In-Group Religious Priming Decrease Negative Out-group Attitudes of Majority Group Members?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, The Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, U.K. <Not Available>. 2018-06-19 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1243652_index.html

Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When do majority groups endorse negative attitudes toward minority members, and what factors are involved in these perceptions? Studies have revealed that priming of religious concepts induced pro-social behaviors, but also increased prejudice towards minorities. Yet, more empirical research on how various religious groups traverse their social world, particularly in their interactions with minority group members, is needed. The present research extends the use of visual cognitive priming to the context of social and group differences by examining how supraliminal and subliminal priming of religious symbols affect out-group attitudes.
Three experiments examined the influence of religious concepts on prejudices and threat perceptions of Jews towards Muslims. In Study 1, students completed a search puzzle by which they were exposed to out-group, in-group or neutral religious symbols, and filled questionnaires assessing their out-group attitudes. Priming did not affect attitudes. In Study 2 subliminal priming was employed. It was found that subliminal exposure to Jewish in-group religious concepts reduced negative attitudes towards Muslims, as reflected by measures of prejudice, social distance, realistic and symbolic threat perceptions. Inter-group anxiety, however, was not affected by priming. In Study 3, comparable supraliminal and subliminal priming techniques were employed and it was confirmed that only for the in-group religious concept condition subliminal primes reduced the majority's negative attitudes towards Muslims relative to supraliminal primes.
We suggest the important role of religious content in contributing to intergroup attitude formation. Moreover, the findings highlight the role that religion plays in social-cognitive structures mainly in political intergroup conflict.


Similar Titles:
The Effects of Priming Negative Group Attitudes

Intergroup Contact among Members of Religious and Secular Groups in Turkey: The role of group efficacy, relative deprivation and group esteem threat.

Negative media portrayals of immigrants give rise to majority membersÂ’ perceived group threat: A longitudinal analysis


 
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