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Statistics as Statecraft: National Statistical Systems (NSS) and State Building, 1800 to 2011

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Abstract:

This article theoretically explores the structural conditions under which nation-state builders are able to institutionalize statistical statecraft from 1800 to 2011 by empirically analyzing a unique dataset with information about the timing of the establishment of National Statistical Systems (NSS) in 163 countries. On one hand, I theorize statistics as statecraft for making society legible, deploying state power, and making national boundaries. On the other hand, I further examine how the rate of institutionalizing statistical statecraft is influenced by democratization, modernization (industrialization and economic development), world society, and colonialism. Results demonstrate that the adoption of the statecraft of statistics originated in nineteenth-century Europe and diffused to other parts of the world in the twentieth century, especially after World War II, with the rapid surge of the formation of nation-states. Event history analyses further suggest democracy, modernization, and word society are robust structural factors accelerating the institutionalization of statistical statecraft. By contrast, colonialism delays the institutionalization in most parts of the non-Western world.
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Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255423_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ho, Jing-Mao. "Statistics as Statecraft: National Statistical Systems (NSS) and State Building, 1800 to 2011" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-07-04 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255423_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ho, J. , 2017-08-12 "Statistics as Statecraft: National Statistical Systems (NSS) and State Building, 1800 to 2011" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-07-04 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1255423_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This article theoretically explores the structural conditions under which nation-state builders are able to institutionalize statistical statecraft from 1800 to 2011 by empirically analyzing a unique dataset with information about the timing of the establishment of National Statistical Systems (NSS) in 163 countries. On one hand, I theorize statistics as statecraft for making society legible, deploying state power, and making national boundaries. On the other hand, I further examine how the rate of institutionalizing statistical statecraft is influenced by democratization, modernization (industrialization and economic development), world society, and colonialism. Results demonstrate that the adoption of the statecraft of statistics originated in nineteenth-century Europe and diffused to other parts of the world in the twentieth century, especially after World War II, with the rapid surge of the formation of nation-states. Event history analyses further suggest democracy, modernization, and word society are robust structural factors accelerating the institutionalization of statistical statecraft. By contrast, colonialism delays the institutionalization in most parts of the non-Western world.


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