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What Do Statistics Tell Us About Criminal Aliens In the United States and Transnational Connections?

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Abstract:

The Office of Immigration (2005) and/or the General Accounting Office (2005) provide statistics on individuals committing the crime of entry without citizenship or smuggling. A separate category, “criminal aliens” covers deportation of immigrants for conventional crime under rules increasingly broadened during the War on Drugs, War on Crime and the emergent stage of concern about terror after the first World Trade center and the Oklahoma bombing incidents in the 1990s. Trends in the degree to which crime is connected to citizenship as opposed to aggravated felonies requiring deportation are examined. Problems occur in government presentation of these statistics with regard to determining the timing of alien criminality because retroactive deportation and deportation upon prison release are not differentiated and make it difficult to determine the immigrant resident alien crime rate. Immigrant community concerns about report of crime and fear of deportation impacts these statistics as well through under-reporting. Issues exist with regard to inter-state variation in what would be considered an aggravated felony and legal challenges to retroactive deportation which make it hard to determine immigrant crime rates as well. Finally, secondary sources are examined to determine the transnational consequences of the “two-way street” upon entry and future consequences for organized crime.
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Association:
Name: American Society of Criminology (ASC)
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p126742_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Warner, Dr. Judith. "What Do Statistics Tell Us About Criminal Aliens In the United States and Transnational Connections?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA, Nov 01, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p126742_index.html>

APA Citation:

Warner, D. A. , 2006-11-01 "What Do Statistics Tell Us About Criminal Aliens In the United States and Transnational Connections?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology (ASC), Los Angeles Convention Center, Los Angeles, CA <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p126742_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Office of Immigration (2005) and/or the General Accounting Office (2005) provide statistics on individuals committing the crime of entry without citizenship or smuggling. A separate category, “criminal aliens” covers deportation of immigrants for conventional crime under rules increasingly broadened during the War on Drugs, War on Crime and the emergent stage of concern about terror after the first World Trade center and the Oklahoma bombing incidents in the 1990s. Trends in the degree to which crime is connected to citizenship as opposed to aggravated felonies requiring deportation are examined. Problems occur in government presentation of these statistics with regard to determining the timing of alien criminality because retroactive deportation and deportation upon prison release are not differentiated and make it difficult to determine the immigrant resident alien crime rate. Immigrant community concerns about report of crime and fear of deportation impacts these statistics as well through under-reporting. Issues exist with regard to inter-state variation in what would be considered an aggravated felony and legal challenges to retroactive deportation which make it hard to determine immigrant crime rates as well. Finally, secondary sources are examined to determine the transnational consequences of the “two-way street” upon entry and future consequences for organized crime.

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