Citation

The Stigma Factor: How Stigma Attitudes Moderate Emotional Responses to Health Message Frames

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Abstract:

There has been much work about the ways media influences stigma; however, there is little research examining how stigma impacts the ways audiences think and feel about different media stories about health issues. This study begins to answer questions about the ways emotions and individual differences interact with framing effects. Using common frames in health news stories: Iyengar’s (1991) thematic (societal factors) and episodic (individual experience) frames as well as gain (benefits) and loss (consequences) frames, this study utilized a 2 (thematic/episodic frame) x 2 (gain/loss frame) between-groups factorial design to examine whether stigma moderated framing’s impact on the emotions of anger, sadness, and fear. Results found that certain characteristics of stigma do moderate framing’s impact on emotion readers felt when reading stories about obesity and depression, indicating stigma’s importance as a consideration for message creation by journalists and health communicators.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

stigma (198), frame (187), depress (105), stori (89), stigmat (82), condit (78), differ (73), cours (72), emot (72), obes (71), high (60), studi (59), person (58), characterist (51), factor (50), 2 (49), moder (47), anger (46), strong (45), 3 (44), peopl (44),
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Association:
Name: AEJMC
URL:
http://www.aejmc.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282208_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Jankowski, Stacie. "The Stigma Factor: How Stigma Attitudes Moderate Emotional Responses to Health Message Frames" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282208_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jankowski, S. , 2017-08-09 "The Stigma Factor: How Stigma Attitudes Moderate Emotional Responses to Health Message Frames" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-06-19 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282208_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There has been much work about the ways media influences stigma; however, there is little research examining how stigma impacts the ways audiences think and feel about different media stories about health issues. This study begins to answer questions about the ways emotions and individual differences interact with framing effects. Using common frames in health news stories: Iyengar’s (1991) thematic (societal factors) and episodic (individual experience) frames as well as gain (benefits) and loss (consequences) frames, this study utilized a 2 (thematic/episodic frame) x 2 (gain/loss frame) between-groups factorial design to examine whether stigma moderated framing’s impact on the emotions of anger, sadness, and fear. Results found that certain characteristics of stigma do moderate framing’s impact on emotion readers felt when reading stories about obesity and depression, indicating stigma’s importance as a consideration for message creation by journalists and health communicators.


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