Citation

Enslaved Agrarian Knowledge and the Limits to Planter Power from the U.S. South to India

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper draws upon multi-sited archival research in Britain, India, and the United States to examine the role that enslaved people played in limiting planter access to knowledge about Carolina rice cultivation. Throughout the first half of the nineteenth century, Carolina rice was singularly valued within European markets. In response to expanding demand after 1830, the East India Company and Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India sought to introduce Carolina rice cultivation across South Asia in experimental projects that included both the Bengal and Madras presidencies. Yet, these projects failed. By focusing upon how these projects failed, this paper provides insight into ways that Carolina rice cultivation rested upon the knowledge, skill, and work of enslaved people in the South Carolina and Georgia lowcountry.
Enslaved people placed crucial limits upon the expansion of Carolina rice cultivation in the United States during the nineteenth century. Planter ignorance about enslaved practices of rice cultivation further limited the global expansion of this cultivation. In the U.S. South, the self-activity of enslaved people enabled considerable control of the process of rice cultivation and milling. This control challenged planter violence while setting limits to the expansion of Carolina rice cultivation. Ultimately, attention to enslaved practices of mid-nineteenth century Carolina rice cultivation provides a unique vantage for considering how enslaved people’s self-activity informed the shape of global racial and economic formations across empires.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 102nd Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1298193_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Sell, Zach. "Enslaved Agrarian Knowledge and the Limits to Planter Power from the U.S. South to India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 102nd Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza Hotel, Cincinnati, OH, <Not Available>. 2018-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1298193_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sell, Z. "Enslaved Agrarian Knowledge and the Limits to Planter Power from the U.S. South to India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 102nd Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza Hotel, Cincinnati, OH <Not Available>. 2018-06-18 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1298193_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: This paper draws upon multi-sited archival research in Britain, India, and the United States to examine the role that enslaved people played in limiting planter access to knowledge about Carolina rice cultivation. Throughout the first half of the nineteenth century, Carolina rice was singularly valued within European markets. In response to expanding demand after 1830, the East India Company and Agricultural and Horticultural Society of India sought to introduce Carolina rice cultivation across South Asia in experimental projects that included both the Bengal and Madras presidencies. Yet, these projects failed. By focusing upon how these projects failed, this paper provides insight into ways that Carolina rice cultivation rested upon the knowledge, skill, and work of enslaved people in the South Carolina and Georgia lowcountry.
Enslaved people placed crucial limits upon the expansion of Carolina rice cultivation in the United States during the nineteenth century. Planter ignorance about enslaved practices of rice cultivation further limited the global expansion of this cultivation. In the U.S. South, the self-activity of enslaved people enabled considerable control of the process of rice cultivation and milling. This control challenged planter violence while setting limits to the expansion of Carolina rice cultivation. Ultimately, attention to enslaved practices of mid-nineteenth century Carolina rice cultivation provides a unique vantage for considering how enslaved people’s self-activity informed the shape of global racial and economic formations across empires.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.