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Back in the Shadows, Back in the Streets

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Abstract:

In the days and months after the November 2016 election, undocumented Latinos (among other vulnerable communities) questioned how their lives might change under a Trump administration. Would they have to worry about being deported to countries they’ve never known, or lose their eligibility for things like driver’s licenses and work permits? Stories of hate crimes and racial profiling, as well as actual deportations, created further fear and uncertainty. Using data from the Collaborative Multiracial Post-Election Survey (CMPS), collected from December 2016 to February 2017, and the 2012 Latino Immigrant National Election Study (LINES), collected October to December 2012 (with pre- and post-election waves), we examine the political attitudes and reported behavior of Latinos across immigration status (US born, noncitizen legal residents, and undocumented) in the Trump era and compare them to similar samples from four years earlier. We find significant evidence that Trump’s rhetoric and actions have increased anxiety but also increased non-electoral political participation among Latinos across status subgroups. Overall, we find heightened feelings of political cynicism, but also increased reports of engagement. Trump’s policies may be driving Latino undocumented immigrants back in the shadows to avoid deportation and detention, but they are also back on the (political) streets demanding that their voices be heard.
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Association:
Name: 89th Annual SPSA Conference
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http://www.spsa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1326973_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Michelson, Melissa. and Lavariega Monforti, Jessica. "Back in the Shadows, Back in the Streets" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 04, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1326973_index.html>

APA Citation:

Michelson, M. R. and Lavariega Monforti, J. L. , 2018-01-04 "Back in the Shadows, Back in the Streets" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1326973_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the days and months after the November 2016 election, undocumented Latinos (among other vulnerable communities) questioned how their lives might change under a Trump administration. Would they have to worry about being deported to countries they’ve never known, or lose their eligibility for things like driver’s licenses and work permits? Stories of hate crimes and racial profiling, as well as actual deportations, created further fear and uncertainty. Using data from the Collaborative Multiracial Post-Election Survey (CMPS), collected from December 2016 to February 2017, and the 2012 Latino Immigrant National Election Study (LINES), collected October to December 2012 (with pre- and post-election waves), we examine the political attitudes and reported behavior of Latinos across immigration status (US born, noncitizen legal residents, and undocumented) in the Trump era and compare them to similar samples from four years earlier. We find significant evidence that Trump’s rhetoric and actions have increased anxiety but also increased non-electoral political participation among Latinos across status subgroups. Overall, we find heightened feelings of political cynicism, but also increased reports of engagement. Trump’s policies may be driving Latino undocumented immigrants back in the shadows to avoid deportation and detention, but they are also back on the (political) streets demanding that their voices be heard.


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