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Like Parent, Like Child? Parental Transmission of Political Values in a High Choice Media

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Abstract:

In recent decades the media environment has fragmented, with consumers increasingly having access to more media choices and partisan news sources. Over this same period, politically engaged parents have become more successful at passing on their political attitudes and behaviors to their offspring, while politically unengaged parents have become less successful. The result is a growing gap in the ability of engaged and unengaged parents to successfully socialize their children with similar political beliefs. I propose an explanation for this “transmission gap” focusing on changes to the media environment in recent decades.

I argue that as media consumption patterns have stratified along parental engagement levels, household media consumption can either strengthen or dampen transmission of political attitudes from parent to child. Using both existing data and an original dataset based on a survey of parents and adolescents from one large Midwestern city and one large Southern city, I demonstrate that the media environment in a household influences the successful transmission of parental attitudes, with parents in households consuming news programming experiencing greater transmission success than those in households consuming mostly entertainment programming, and parents in households that consume partisan news programming experiencing greater success than parents in those other two types of household media environments. By focusing on time-varying contextual factors, this paper suggests that the socialization process, not just the attitudes passed on, is contingent upon the period in which it occurs. Thus, this paper has implications for the study of adolescent political development, political socialization, and political communication.
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Association:
Name: 89th Annual SPSA Conference
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http://www.spsa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1327127_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Jenkins, Clinton. "Like Parent, Like Child? Parental Transmission of Political Values in a High Choice Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 04, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1327127_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jenkins, C. M. , 2018-01-04 "Like Parent, Like Child? Parental Transmission of Political Values in a High Choice Media" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1327127_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent decades the media environment has fragmented, with consumers increasingly having access to more media choices and partisan news sources. Over this same period, politically engaged parents have become more successful at passing on their political attitudes and behaviors to their offspring, while politically unengaged parents have become less successful. The result is a growing gap in the ability of engaged and unengaged parents to successfully socialize their children with similar political beliefs. I propose an explanation for this “transmission gap” focusing on changes to the media environment in recent decades.

I argue that as media consumption patterns have stratified along parental engagement levels, household media consumption can either strengthen or dampen transmission of political attitudes from parent to child. Using both existing data and an original dataset based on a survey of parents and adolescents from one large Midwestern city and one large Southern city, I demonstrate that the media environment in a household influences the successful transmission of parental attitudes, with parents in households consuming news programming experiencing greater transmission success than those in households consuming mostly entertainment programming, and parents in households that consume partisan news programming experiencing greater success than parents in those other two types of household media environments. By focusing on time-varying contextual factors, this paper suggests that the socialization process, not just the attitudes passed on, is contingent upon the period in which it occurs. Thus, this paper has implications for the study of adolescent political development, political socialization, and political communication.


Similar Titles:
The Polarizing Effects of News Preference on Political Learning and Participation in a High-Choice Media Environment

Child Agency and the Transmission of Political Values: Evidence from Australia


 
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