Citation

Broken Record: Causes and Consequences of the Changing Roll Call Voting Record in the U.S. Congress

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Abstract:

Scholars of congressional politics frequently report that polarization is at an all-time high. Measures of polarization are based on longitudinal analyses of roll call vote data – data generated when Congress decides which legislative items warrant a recorded vote. If the way Congress generates roll call data over time is inconsistent, measures of polarization and other measures of congressional behavior, may be biased. We assess the type of votes that make up the roll call record over time, considering the relative contribution of final passage votes, amendment votes, and procedural votes. Incorporating both data collected by undergraduate coders and data collected by scraping congressional documents, we have developed an original dataset of all recorded and unrecorded amendments to major legislation from the 59th Congress (1905-1906) to 113th Congress (2013-2014). We use this dataset to examine the changing link between the ideology of an item’s sponsor and the likelihood a recorded vote was taken. Preliminary evidence suggests that much of the increase in roll call voting is attributable to amendments sponsored by more extreme members for electoral purposes.
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Association:
Name: 89th Annual SPSA Conference
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http://www.spsa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1329172_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lynch, Michael. and Madonna, Anthony. "Broken Record: Causes and Consequences of the Changing Roll Call Voting Record in the U.S. Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1329172_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lynch, M. and Madonna, A. J. , 2018-01-03 "Broken Record: Causes and Consequences of the Changing Roll Call Voting Record in the U.S. Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1329172_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars of congressional politics frequently report that polarization is at an all-time high. Measures of polarization are based on longitudinal analyses of roll call vote data – data generated when Congress decides which legislative items warrant a recorded vote. If the way Congress generates roll call data over time is inconsistent, measures of polarization and other measures of congressional behavior, may be biased. We assess the type of votes that make up the roll call record over time, considering the relative contribution of final passage votes, amendment votes, and procedural votes. Incorporating both data collected by undergraduate coders and data collected by scraping congressional documents, we have developed an original dataset of all recorded and unrecorded amendments to major legislation from the 59th Congress (1905-1906) to 113th Congress (2013-2014). We use this dataset to examine the changing link between the ideology of an item’s sponsor and the likelihood a recorded vote was taken. Preliminary evidence suggests that much of the increase in roll call voting is attributable to amendments sponsored by more extreme members for electoral purposes.


Similar Titles:
Building a Record: Requesting Roll Call Votes under Changing Institutions

Broken Record: Electoral Competition, Procedural Complexity and the Changing Congressional Roll Call Voting Record, 1877-2012


 
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