Citation

Public Attitude Toward Migrants in Japan: Does Public Perception toward Citizenship Matter?

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Abstract:

This paper aims to investigate in natives’ attitude toward migrants in Japan, which strictly follows jus sanguinis principle. It is especially motivated by the following research questions; 1) Do Japanese people emphasize blood as their citizenship law indicates?; and 2) Does their view on citizenship truly influence their attitude toward migrants? To understand a relationship between people’s perception toward citizenship and their attitude on migrants, I conducted a survey in Japan in 2015. The results show that majority of people in Japan indeed values blood or ancestral ties importantly. Moreover, in order to investigate in Japanese people’s attitude toward migrants, the survey asked questions on their proximity toward various types of migrants. Also, I further asked their images on migrants, who have particularly lived in Japan for a long time. The overall responses on these questions show that Japanese people tend to have positive feelings toward migrants regardless of types while their degree of proximity is higher for permanent or naturalized migrants. However, when their perception toward citizenship is introduced, these two categories of migrants tend to yield a greater variation. In other words, people adhering to blood tend to show more negative attitudes toward permanent or naturalized ones.
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Association:
Name: 89th Annual SPSA Conference
URL:
http://www.spsa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1343105_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Woo, Yu Jin. "Public Attitude Toward Migrants in Japan: Does Public Perception toward Citizenship Matter?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 04, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1343105_index.html>

APA Citation:

Woo, Y. , 2018-01-04 "Public Attitude Toward Migrants in Japan: Does Public Perception toward Citizenship Matter?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2018-08-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1343105_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper aims to investigate in natives’ attitude toward migrants in Japan, which strictly follows jus sanguinis principle. It is especially motivated by the following research questions; 1) Do Japanese people emphasize blood as their citizenship law indicates?; and 2) Does their view on citizenship truly influence their attitude toward migrants? To understand a relationship between people’s perception toward citizenship and their attitude on migrants, I conducted a survey in Japan in 2015. The results show that majority of people in Japan indeed values blood or ancestral ties importantly. Moreover, in order to investigate in Japanese people’s attitude toward migrants, the survey asked questions on their proximity toward various types of migrants. Also, I further asked their images on migrants, who have particularly lived in Japan for a long time. The overall responses on these questions show that Japanese people tend to have positive feelings toward migrants regardless of types while their degree of proximity is higher for permanent or naturalized migrants. However, when their perception toward citizenship is introduced, these two categories of migrants tend to yield a greater variation. In other words, people adhering to blood tend to show more negative attitudes toward permanent or naturalized ones.


Similar Titles:
Public Perception toward Migrants: Citizenship Law Matters?

Public Perception toward Migrants: Citizenship Law Matters?


 
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