Citation

Does gender really matter in the boardroom? Evidence from closely held family firms

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Abstract:

In this study we show that director talent and not gender alone drives firms’ performance. Using a unique hand-collected sample of 523 closely held Colombian family firms and constructing a professionalism index after a detailed analysis of 815 curriculum vitae of executives, we show that female directors have a negative effect on firm performance. However, when we separate female directors into two groups, family female directors and outside female directors, the latter has a positive and significant effect on firm performance. Moreover, we show that outside female directors are significantly better trained than family female directors in terms of education and experience. We also show that family female directors are significantly less trained than family male directors, who are also better trained than outside male directors. This suggests that family firms favor the selection of men to take control of family businesses. Furthermore, the presence of family female directors is more likely to be associated with nepotism or family quotas than with talent.
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0 (1),

Author's Keywords:

Gender diversity, boardroom, family firms, family female directors.
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Association:
Name: BALAS
URL:
http://http://www.balas.org/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1346823_index.html
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MLA Citation:

González, Maximiliano., Guzmán, Alexander., Pablo, Eduardo. and Trujillo, María. "Does gender really matter in the boardroom? Evidence from closely held family firms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BALAS, University of San Diego, San Diego, USA, Mar 21, 2018 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1346823_index.html>

APA Citation:

González, M. , Guzmán, A. , Pablo, E. and Trujillo, M. A. , 2018-03-21 "Does gender really matter in the boardroom? Evidence from closely held family firms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BALAS, University of San Diego, San Diego, USA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1346823_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this study we show that director talent and not gender alone drives firms’ performance. Using a unique hand-collected sample of 523 closely held Colombian family firms and constructing a professionalism index after a detailed analysis of 815 curriculum vitae of executives, we show that female directors have a negative effect on firm performance. However, when we separate female directors into two groups, family female directors and outside female directors, the latter has a positive and significant effect on firm performance. Moreover, we show that outside female directors are significantly better trained than family female directors in terms of education and experience. We also show that family female directors are significantly less trained than family male directors, who are also better trained than outside male directors. This suggests that family firms favor the selection of men to take control of family businesses. Furthermore, the presence of family female directors is more likely to be associated with nepotism or family quotas than with talent.


 
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