Citation

The LEARN project: Lessons learned from an impact evaluation of flexible approaches to school readiness and early grades learning

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This panel presentation will share experiences and lessons learned from an impact evaluation of the Lao Educational Access, Research and Networking (LEARN Project), implemented by Plan International in partnership with Save the Children International in Lao PDR. LEARN is an action research project that aims to test the effectiveness and scalability of flexible approaches to school readiness and early grades learning that target populations that are typically difficult to reach, including ethnic villages in remote, mountainous areas in the north of the country. The project is designed to build rigorous evidence of that can inform Government of Lao policymaking and resource allocation in pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals and equitable, quality learning for all.

To build this evidence base, LEARN is collaborating with research partner American Institutes for Research (AIR) to conduct a longitudinal study of child development and school readiness that compares outcomes of children in two treatment groups to children in a no-intervention control group as well as children who are enrolled in the government of Lao PDR's existing pre-primary class. The same panel of children is assessed at baseline, prior to enrollment in any school readiness intervention; at mid-term at the start of grade 1, immediately after the main interventions conclude; at endline, at the end of grade 1, to assess how gains from the interventions have held up during the course of the school year; and finally at follow-up at the start of grade 2, to assess if the interventions have been effective in promoting on-time enrollment in second grade.

The LEARN impact evaluation utilizes the Measuring Early Learning Quality and Outcomes (MELQO) child assessment tool, developed by a global consortium of agencies active in education and child development. This tool was first adapted for use in Laos by the Ministry of Education and Sports and the World Bank, with a funding contribution from Dubai Cares through the LEARN Project. The tool assesses a range of child development and school readiness domains, including emergent literacy and numeracy and executive function. Children are assessed both in Lao, the national language of instruction, and in their home language if Lao is not their mother tongue. The child-level tool is complemented by an assessment of parent/caregiver knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding their children's learning and development, as well as an observation of teaching and learning practices in the classroom.

Baseline data collected in 2016 on 1,554 children (795 girls, 759 boys) from across 135 communities indicate that children have very low initial levels of school readiness, although they perform better when assessed in their home language than in the language of instruction. Children in the target villages experience high levels of stunting and limited access to reading materials in the home. In general, girls and boys performed at similar levels on the assessment tasks, while Lao-speaking children fared much better overall than non-Lao speaking children. Mid-term data collection will be completed in late 2017 and preliminary findings should be available in time to share during the conference in March 2018.

This panel will present the methods, findings and lessons learned to date in this impact evaluation. In particular, the panel will share the real-world challenges associated with implementing a rigorous, multi-year evaluation in a challenging context, with low population density, rugged mountain terrain, and multiple language-related barriers. The panel will also delve into the challenges of assessing children's emergent literacy in traditional domains such as letter knowledge and phonological awareness, when the languages being assessed are alpha-syllabic in structure. Finally, the panel will share considerations for other organizations considering implementation of similar evaluations in analogous contexts.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Comparative and International Education Society Conference
URL:
http://www.cies.us


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1353291_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Fonseca, Jodie. "The LEARN project: Lessons learned from an impact evaluation of flexible approaches to school readiness and early grades learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1353291_index.html>

APA Citation:

Fonseca, J. "The LEARN project: Lessons learned from an impact evaluation of flexible approaches to school readiness and early grades learning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1353291_index.html

Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This panel presentation will share experiences and lessons learned from an impact evaluation of the Lao Educational Access, Research and Networking (LEARN Project), implemented by Plan International in partnership with Save the Children International in Lao PDR. LEARN is an action research project that aims to test the effectiveness and scalability of flexible approaches to school readiness and early grades learning that target populations that are typically difficult to reach, including ethnic villages in remote, mountainous areas in the north of the country. The project is designed to build rigorous evidence of that can inform Government of Lao policymaking and resource allocation in pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals and equitable, quality learning for all.

To build this evidence base, LEARN is collaborating with research partner American Institutes for Research (AIR) to conduct a longitudinal study of child development and school readiness that compares outcomes of children in two treatment groups to children in a no-intervention control group as well as children who are enrolled in the government of Lao PDR's existing pre-primary class. The same panel of children is assessed at baseline, prior to enrollment in any school readiness intervention; at mid-term at the start of grade 1, immediately after the main interventions conclude; at endline, at the end of grade 1, to assess how gains from the interventions have held up during the course of the school year; and finally at follow-up at the start of grade 2, to assess if the interventions have been effective in promoting on-time enrollment in second grade.

The LEARN impact evaluation utilizes the Measuring Early Learning Quality and Outcomes (MELQO) child assessment tool, developed by a global consortium of agencies active in education and child development. This tool was first adapted for use in Laos by the Ministry of Education and Sports and the World Bank, with a funding contribution from Dubai Cares through the LEARN Project. The tool assesses a range of child development and school readiness domains, including emergent literacy and numeracy and executive function. Children are assessed both in Lao, the national language of instruction, and in their home language if Lao is not their mother tongue. The child-level tool is complemented by an assessment of parent/caregiver knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding their children's learning and development, as well as an observation of teaching and learning practices in the classroom.

Baseline data collected in 2016 on 1,554 children (795 girls, 759 boys) from across 135 communities indicate that children have very low initial levels of school readiness, although they perform better when assessed in their home language than in the language of instruction. Children in the target villages experience high levels of stunting and limited access to reading materials in the home. In general, girls and boys performed at similar levels on the assessment tasks, while Lao-speaking children fared much better overall than non-Lao speaking children. Mid-term data collection will be completed in late 2017 and preliminary findings should be available in time to share during the conference in March 2018.

This panel will present the methods, findings and lessons learned to date in this impact evaluation. In particular, the panel will share the real-world challenges associated with implementing a rigorous, multi-year evaluation in a challenging context, with low population density, rugged mountain terrain, and multiple language-related barriers. The panel will also delve into the challenges of assessing children's emergent literacy in traditional domains such as letter knowledge and phonological awareness, when the languages being assessed are alpha-syllabic in structure. Finally, the panel will share considerations for other organizations considering implementation of similar evaluations in analogous contexts.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.