Citation

Is McCreary a Lemon?: Neutrality and the Lemon Test in McCreary v. ACLU

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

This paper will examine the Supreme Court's 2005 rulings on Ten Commandments displays in the McCreary and Van Orden cases to see if the Court does indeed have a consistent standard for judging Establishment Clause cases.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

court (94), case (83), display (75), religi (70), test (65), lemon (61), establish (59), religion (55), claus (54), govern (35), u.s (35), v (33), command (32), opinion (30), argu (30), state (30), rule (30), ten (30), constitut (29), mccreari (28), first (24),
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: The Midwest Political Science Association
URL:
http://www.indiana.edu/~mpsa/


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p140772_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

McCumbers, Rebecca. "Is McCreary a Lemon?: Neutrality and the Lemon Test in McCreary v. ACLU" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p140772_index.html>

APA Citation:

McCumbers, R. J. , 2006-04-20 "Is McCreary a Lemon?: Neutrality and the Lemon Test in McCreary v. ACLU" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2013-12-17 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p140772_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper will examine the Supreme Court's 2005 rulings on Ten Commandments displays in the McCreary and Van Orden cases to see if the Court does indeed have a consistent standard for judging Establishment Clause cases.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Political Research Online
Abstract Only All Academic Inc.
Associated Document Available The Midwest Political Science Association

Document Type: application/pdf
Page count: 22
Word count: 7418
Text sample:
Is McCreary a Lemon?: Neutrality and the Lemon Test in McCreary v. ACLU and Van Orden v. Perry Rebecca J. McCumbers Ph.D. Student University of Notre Dame Department of Political Science rmccumbe@nd.edu Abstract: In the wake of the Supreme Court’s 2005 rulings concerning the constitutionality of Ten Commandments displays there has been renewed debate over the consistency of the Court’s Establishment Clause jurisprudence. In Van Orden v. Perry the Court determined that Texas’ display was constitutional while in McCreary
is a tension between these two clauses but Rehnquist argues this tension is of the Court’s making. He attributes the tension to several causes one of which is an overly expansive interpretation of both the Free Exercise and the Establishment Clauses in past Supreme Court cases. A more limited interpretation of both he argues would decrease this tension. Rehnquist however is not clear about what it would mean to read the clauses as a coherent whole rather than as


Similar Titles:
Divided Governments and the Institutional Legitimacy of National Highest Courts: A Case Study of Korean Constitutional Court

Rule of Law or Rule of Factions: Establishment, the Supreme Court, and Religious Liberty


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.