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SEAS - Actualizing Assessment for Faculty and Candidates
Unformatted Document Text:  SEAS: Actualizing Assessment for Faculty and Candidates “We must constantly remind ourselves that the ultimate purpose of evaluation is to have students become self-evaluating. If students graduate from our schools still dependent upon others to tell them when they are adequate, good, or excellent, then we’ve missed the whole point of what education is about?” Costa and Kallick, 1992 Section I: ContentA. Statement of the Issue:‘Self-assessment’, ‘reflective practice’, ‘learner engagement’ – these phrases while oft repeated do not constitute a mantra that is adequate to bring the practitioner to the state of actually engaging in these desirable behaviors. These phrases seem to refer to the actions of a solitary individual yet ironically they are best actualized through collaborative action – action that occurs at multiple organizational levels within an educational institution. What then is needed within a School of Education to create the conditions, communicate the expectations, and perhaps most important provide the wherewithal for faculty and teacher candidates to actively and effectively engage in self-reflection, reflective practice and engaged learning? This roundtable is designed to give participants the opportunity to work with an emerging integrated assessment system that combines analytical data-mining tools with procedures and protocols for collaborative efforts to look at teacher candidates’ work contained in electronic portfolios and then to move from refection to action to reflection again, like the recurring but varying action of ocean waves. The acronym for this set of resources and procedures is SEAS – School of Education System. B. Literature reviewA recent Google search revealed more than 15,000,000 hits for the phrase “reflective practice”! But going back to the work of Donald Schön (1987), we see three key features of his notion of developing reflective practitioners. First, there is a strong, perhaps crucial, collaborative component to the process; second, reflection is tied to actual experience; and third, the process is a tool for action rather than a tool for finding ‘Truth’. Joy Amulya has said that “[r]eflective practice is creating a habit, structure, or routine around examining experience” (2003). So, how do Schön’s notions mesh with current practice? Perhaps the most visible approach to incorporating reflective practice is the use of portfolios created by teacher candidates or practicing teachers going for National Board for Professional Teaching certification. While portfolios usually include a reflective component, this reflection is often a solitary process and typically candidates have little if any recurring opportunity to utilize the process to inform their own practice. Among faculty, the process of collaborative reflection on our teaching is even less common. In this context, where do teacher candidates see this reflective practice modeled? C. ContributionThe SEAS is a faculty oriented assessment system that brings together (1) the extensive information contained in college’s student information system, (2) standards and rubrics for candidates knowledge, skills and dispositions, (3) faculty ratings of student work and, (4) in most cases the actual work in written, auditory, and/or video form along with the student’s comments on the work. aacte07_proceeding_142812.doc 1

Authors: Shwedel, Allan (Rocky).
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SEAS: Actualizing Assessment for Faculty and Candidates
“We must constantly remind ourselves that the ultimate purpose of evaluation is to have
students become self-evaluating. If students graduate from our schools still dependent upon
others to tell them when they are adequate, good, or excellent, then we’ve missed the whole
point of what education is about?”
Costa and Kallick, 1992
Section I: Content
A. Statement of the Issue:
‘Self-assessment’, ‘reflective practice’, ‘learner engagement’ – these phrases while oft repeated
do not constitute a mantra that is adequate to bring the practitioner to the state of actually
engaging in these desirable behaviors. These phrases seem to refer to the actions of a solitary
individual yet ironically they are best actualized through collaborative action – action that occurs
at multiple organizational levels within an educational institution. What then is needed within a
School of Education to create the conditions, communicate the expectations, and perhaps most
important provide the wherewithal for faculty and teacher candidates to actively and effectively
engage in self-reflection, reflective practice and engaged learning?
This roundtable is designed to give participants the opportunity to work with an emerging
integrated assessment system that combines analytical data-mining tools with procedures and
protocols for collaborative efforts to look at teacher candidates’ work contained in electronic
portfolios and then to move from refection to action to reflection again, like the recurring but
varying action of ocean waves. The acronym for this set of resources and procedures is SEAS –
School of Education System.
B. Literature review
A recent Google search revealed more than 15,000,000 hits for the phrase “reflective practice”!
But going back to the work of Donald Schön (1987), we see three key features of his notion of
developing reflective practitioners. First, there is a strong, perhaps crucial, collaborative
component to the process; second, reflection is tied to actual experience; and third, the process is
a tool for action rather than a tool for finding ‘Truth’.
Joy Amulya has said that “[r]eflective practice is creating a habit, structure, or routine around
examining experience” (2003). So, how do Schön’s notions mesh with current practice? Perhaps
the most visible approach to incorporating reflective practice is the use of portfolios created by
teacher candidates or practicing teachers going for National Board for Professional Teaching
certification. While portfolios usually include a reflective component, this reflection is often a
solitary process and typically candidates have little if any recurring opportunity to utilize the
process to inform their own practice. Among faculty, the process of collaborative reflection on
our teaching is even less common. In this context, where do teacher candidates see this
reflective practice modeled?
C. Contribution
The SEAS is a faculty oriented assessment system that brings together (1) the extensive
information contained in college’s student information system, (2) standards and rubrics for
candidates knowledge, skills and dispositions, (3) faculty ratings of student work and, (4) in most
cases the actual work in written, auditory, and/or video form along with the student’s comments
on the work.
aacte07_proceeding_142812.doc
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