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SEAS - Actualizing Assessment for Faculty and Candidates
Unformatted Document Text:  Beyond the computer-based information storage, retrieval, and analytic components, SEAS includes guidelines and protocols for faculty to work collaboratively to examine student work at the course level and across the program. It is the melding of computer resources with institutional practice that is creating an environment where faculty can engage in reflective practice and model the process for teacher candidates. The longitudinal content of the electronic portfolios also enables the candidates to periodically reflect on their own professional development. D. Relevance: With the time, money and effort going into the development of electronic portfolio systems, it is crucial that faculty find ways to make the massive collection of data into something that is truly useful for teacher candidates and for the faculty themselves. SEAS is one approach to moving from ‘localized grading’ to using student work to enhance faculty collaboration and enhance teaching and learning. E. Implication for Action: Faculty need tools and time to engage in reflective practice. SEAS is a vehicle for providing the tools and institutionalizing at least a minimal amount of time to engage in this important process. While a comprehensive assessment system is not easily implemented, seeing that it can be done will give participants ideas about how they can make changes at their own institutions. Section II: Outcomes and MethodsA. Learner/participant outcomes: Participants will have the opportunity to see how SEAS is structured and to actually participate in the process of looking at student work and generating action plans for faculty and students. From this experience and conversation with other participants, they will have a framework to begin to refining the assessment system and process at their own institutions. B. Methods: Laptop computers will be provided to participants so they can actually work with sample materials from SEAS 1 . The session will begin with a brief overview of SEAS (5minutes). The core of the session will be a review of quantitative data tied to the college’s core standards for teacher candidates with an examination of student work based on questions derived from the aggregate data. This portion of the session will conclude with participants offering suggestions for refinements in instructional practice (15 minutes). There will be a brief wrap-up with time for additional questions and sharing of ideas (10 minutes). References:Amulya, J. (2003) “What is reflective practice?”. Cambridge, MA: Center for Reflective Community Practice, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Costa, A., and Kallick, B. (1992). "Reassessing assessment." In If Minds Matter, edited by J. Bellanca, R. Fogarty, and A. Costa. Palatine, Ill.: Skylight Publishing. Schön, D. (1987) “Educating the reflective practitioner”, Paper presentation Annual Convention of the American Educational Research Association. Retrieved June 5, 2006 from http://educ.queensu.ca/~russellt/howteach/schon87.htm. 1 Six laptops will be provided by the presenter through the School of Education’s laptop loaner program. aacte07_proceeding_142812.doc 2

Authors: Shwedel, Allan (Rocky).
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Beyond the computer-based information storage, retrieval, and analytic components, SEAS
includes guidelines and protocols for faculty to work collaboratively to examine student work at
the course level and across the program. It is the melding of computer resources with
institutional practice that is creating an environment where faculty can engage in reflective
practice and model the process for teacher candidates. The longitudinal content of the electronic
portfolios also enables the candidates to periodically reflect on their own professional
development.
D. Relevance:
With the time, money and effort going into the development of electronic portfolio systems, it is
crucial that faculty find ways to make the massive collection of data into something that is truly
useful for teacher candidates and for the faculty themselves. SEAS is one approach to moving
from ‘localized grading’ to using student work to enhance faculty collaboration and enhance
teaching and learning.
E. Implication for Action:
Faculty need tools and time to engage in reflective practice. SEAS is a vehicle for providing the
tools and institutionalizing at least a minimal amount of time to engage in this important process.
While a comprehensive assessment system is not easily implemented, seeing that it can be done
will give participants ideas about how they can make changes at their own institutions.
Section II: Outcomes and Methods
A. Learner/participant outcomes:
Participants will have the opportunity to see how SEAS is structured and to actually participate
in the process of looking at student work and generating action plans for faculty and students.
From this experience and conversation with other participants, they will have a framework to
begin to refining the assessment system and process at their own institutions.
B. Methods:
Laptop computers will be provided to participants so they can actually work with sample
materials from SEAS
. The session will begin with a brief overview of SEAS (5minutes). The
core of the session will be a review of quantitative data tied to the college’s core standards for
teacher candidates with an examination of student work based on questions derived from the
aggregate data. This portion of the session will conclude with participants offering suggestions
for refinements in instructional practice (15 minutes). There will be a brief wrap-up with time
for additional questions and sharing of ideas (10 minutes).
References:
Amulya, J. (2003) “What is reflective practice?”. Cambridge, MA: Center for Reflective
Community Practice, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Costa, A., and Kallick, B. (1992). "Reassessing assessment." In If Minds Matter, edited by J.
Bellanca, R. Fogarty, and A. Costa. Palatine, Ill.: Skylight Publishing.
Schön, D. (1987) “Educating the reflective practitioner”, Paper presentation Annual Convention
of the American Educational Research Association. Retrieved June 5, 2006 from
http://educ.queensu.ca/~russellt/howteach/schon87.htm.
1
Six laptops will be provided by the presenter through the School of Education’s laptop loaner program.
aacte07_proceeding_142812.doc
2


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