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An Imperfect Storm: Analyzing Presidential- Congressional Relations and Environment.

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Abstract:

The working relationship that exists between the American executive branch and legislative branches has been called “separated institutions sharing powers.” Due to the complexity of this relationship, it is difficult to gauge and understand the constant power struggle that exists between these two powerful governmental institutions. This difficulty in analysis leads me to ask what environmental variables significantly affect the relationship between Congress and the President. In this manuscript, I examine this relationship by measuring the influence of several theoretically significant environmental factors which are hypothesized to change the behavior of both branches. Using a number of variables including Poole-Rosenthal scores, party control of Congress, divided versus unified government, Southern Democrat identification, Conservative Coalition membership, and Gallup Poll data of Presidential public approval, I analyze what determines Presidential success (measured as Presidential Support Scores) in passing legislation, the use of the Presidential veto as a response to limit Congressional power, and the number of vetoes a President has overridden by Congress. Unlike most previous works, rather than focusing on a single year or session of Congress, the variables are measured on a month to month basis in order to better show the true fluctuations and effects on Presidential Support. More specifically, this manuscript examines the interaction between the President and Congress, and not just one branch attempting to dominate the other. Preliminary analyses indicate a strategic relationship between the President and Congress that constantly changes as the political environment changes. Each branch becomes opportunistic when the other shows weakness or signs of public disapproval.

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presidenti (224), approv (198), success (130), quarter (124), correl (77), level (61), 2 (52), congress (47), signific (39), tail (36), polici (35), domain (29), domest (26), presid (23), hous (23), public (23), tabl (22), foreign (21), senat (21), overal (21), econom (21),
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Name: Southern Political Science Association
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http://www.spsa.net


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MLA Citation:

Windett, Jason. "An Imperfect Storm: Analyzing Presidential- Congressional Relations and Environment." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 03, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143122_index.html>

APA Citation:

Windett, J. H. , 2007-01-03 "An Imperfect Storm: Analyzing Presidential- Congressional Relations and Environment." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, LA Online <PDF>. 2013-12-16 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143122_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The working relationship that exists between the American executive branch and legislative branches has been called “separated institutions sharing powers.” Due to the complexity of this relationship, it is difficult to gauge and understand the constant power struggle that exists between these two powerful governmental institutions. This difficulty in analysis leads me to ask what environmental variables significantly affect the relationship between Congress and the President. In this manuscript, I examine this relationship by measuring the influence of several theoretically significant environmental factors which are hypothesized to change the behavior of both branches. Using a number of variables including Poole-Rosenthal scores, party control of Congress, divided versus unified government, Southern Democrat identification, Conservative Coalition membership, and Gallup Poll data of Presidential public approval, I analyze what determines Presidential success (measured as Presidential Support Scores) in passing legislation, the use of the Presidential veto as a response to limit Congressional power, and the number of vetoes a President has overridden by Congress. Unlike most previous works, rather than focusing on a single year or session of Congress, the variables are measured on a month to month basis in order to better show the true fluctuations and effects on Presidential Support. More specifically, this manuscript examines the interaction between the President and Congress, and not just one branch attempting to dominate the other. Preliminary analyses indicate a strategic relationship between the President and Congress that constantly changes as the political environment changes. Each branch becomes opportunistic when the other shows weakness or signs of public disapproval.

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Document Type: PDF
Page count: 30
Word count: 4495
Text sample:
Presidential Approval and Success: A Quarterly Level Analysis Jason Windett Appalachian State University Jw70581@appstate.edu Paper prepared for presentation at 2007 Southern Political Science Association Annual Conference. In Richard Neustadt’s (1960) canonical work he claims much of a president’s success and ability to persuade congress comes from public prestige. Public prestige he argues is a major source of influence for a president; if he is popular with the public congress will respond favorably to his recommendations and policy preferences. The
-.106 .098 .783** .462** Approval Quarter 3 Presidential -.844** -.108 .188 -.276** .164 Approval Quarter 4 Presidential -.755** .071 Approval Quarter 5 Presidential .108 -.182 .063 Approval Quarter 6 Presidential .254* .044 -.131 -.085 Approval Quarter 7 Presidential -.804 -.064 -.301* Approval * Correlation is Significant at the .05 level (2-tailed). ** Correlation is significant at the .01 level (2-tailed) 30


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