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The Relevance of African American Civic Organizations for Young People in the 21st Century

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Abstract:

TWIGS Incorporated
Playing, working and serving together

On April 11 1948, The TWIGS Mothers’ Club held its first meeting in West Philadelphia with seven Mothers. The founder, Clara Bostic was a retied schoolteacher, who son was the inspiration for the clubs’ formation. Roy Basic Jr. was the first and only Negro child in the Friends Select School, a private school in the outskirts of Philadelphia. His Mother did not want him to grow-up in isolation, and understood the necessity of having “the comfort zone” of the support system in his community during the 1950’s.
Like-minded, pioneering parents who felt a social and civic responsibility were invited for membership. The purpose and mission was appropriate and clear at that time. External factors of segregation for those who had serviced in WWII created an environment for parents of the babies to participate in a wider experience than their parents. TWIGS objective was to encourage and foster mental, physical, social and cultural development of the children who became members.

The name “TWIG” was suggested by a charter member Marion Beckett.

Clara Bostic later defined the the TWIGS symbol with these images, “A twig is a symbol of strength, growth, life and beauty. A twig is really sturdy and resilient. It bends, but seldom breaks!”

The Organization grew to a National level with seven chapters in North Carolina and Virginia. Each chapter with its own bylaws and community/civic focused activities and scholarship funds for young high school graduates of need.

The organization continues today, but has the need changed or is its’ relevance still important? This is a question under consideration for the organization today.

Author's Keywords:

african-american youth organizations
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Association:
Name: Association for the Study of African American Life and History
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143183_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Saunders, Carlena. and Benjamin, Michael. "The Relevance of African American Civic Organizations for Young People in the 21st Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, NA, Atlanta, GA, Sep 26, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143183_index.html>

APA Citation:

Saunders, C. and Benjamin, M. , 2006-09-26 "The Relevance of African American Civic Organizations for Young People in the 21st Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, NA, Atlanta, GA <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p143183_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: TWIGS Incorporated
Playing, working and serving together

On April 11 1948, The TWIGS Mothers’ Club held its first meeting in West Philadelphia with seven Mothers. The founder, Clara Bostic was a retied schoolteacher, who son was the inspiration for the clubs’ formation. Roy Basic Jr. was the first and only Negro child in the Friends Select School, a private school in the outskirts of Philadelphia. His Mother did not want him to grow-up in isolation, and understood the necessity of having “the comfort zone” of the support system in his community during the 1950’s.
Like-minded, pioneering parents who felt a social and civic responsibility were invited for membership. The purpose and mission was appropriate and clear at that time. External factors of segregation for those who had serviced in WWII created an environment for parents of the babies to participate in a wider experience than their parents. TWIGS objective was to encourage and foster mental, physical, social and cultural development of the children who became members.

The name “TWIG” was suggested by a charter member Marion Beckett.

Clara Bostic later defined the the TWIGS symbol with these images, “A twig is a symbol of strength, growth, life and beauty. A twig is really sturdy and resilient. It bends, but seldom breaks!”

The Organization grew to a National level with seven chapters in North Carolina and Virginia. Each chapter with its own bylaws and community/civic focused activities and scholarship funds for young high school graduates of need.

The organization continues today, but has the need changed or is its’ relevance still important? This is a question under consideration for the organization today.

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