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Spirit, Ghost, Goblin or Demon? Supay’s and Hapuñuñu’s Ambivalent Journeys in Colonial Peru

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Abstract:

In this paper, I address Andean examples of early modern European perceptions of the sacred in early colonial Andes, and confront them with Indigenous responses to such perceptions. Examining the Andean people’s understanding of the sacred in the sixteenth century allows us to observe features of early colonial indigenous identity. For the subject (or object) that occupies the position of the sacred reveals an entity of religious worship, considered a divine entity or a privileged mediator with the divinity. The sacred as a manifestation of divinity embodies the place of an ideal identity and its agency.
Significant examples of this transformation may be found in Quechua terms that originally designed identities of the powerful sacred in the Andean world such as camac, huaca, samay, supay, and hapuñuñu. These terms, and the concepts they may have originally referred, were colonized by the Christian Church and Pastoral Quechua, and converted into manifestations of the devil in the Andes. For the purpose of this presentation, I focus on the Quechua term supay, used to refer in general terms to the Andean lord of the underworld who was also described as a ghostly entity, and one of its variants, hapuñuñu, understood as a female agent of evil. By analyzing the intricacies of the possible original meanings of supay before the arrival of the Spaniards, and its distortion in the subsequent European colonization, I seek to understand how the Andean sacred provided a convenient translation to refer to the devil in the Andes
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Name: LASA
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http://lasa.international.pitt.edu


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1464066_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Quispe-Agnoli, Rocío. "Spirit, Ghost, Goblin or Demon? Supay’s and Hapuñuñu’s Ambivalent Journeys in Colonial Peru" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LASA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1464066_index.html>

APA Citation:

Quispe-Agnoli, R. "Spirit, Ghost, Goblin or Demon? Supay’s and Hapuñuñu’s Ambivalent Journeys in Colonial Peru" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LASA <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1464066_index.html

Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In this paper, I address Andean examples of early modern European perceptions of the sacred in early colonial Andes, and confront them with Indigenous responses to such perceptions. Examining the Andean people’s understanding of the sacred in the sixteenth century allows us to observe features of early colonial indigenous identity. For the subject (or object) that occupies the position of the sacred reveals an entity of religious worship, considered a divine entity or a privileged mediator with the divinity. The sacred as a manifestation of divinity embodies the place of an ideal identity and its agency.
Significant examples of this transformation may be found in Quechua terms that originally designed identities of the powerful sacred in the Andean world such as camac, huaca, samay, supay, and hapuñuñu. These terms, and the concepts they may have originally referred, were colonized by the Christian Church and Pastoral Quechua, and converted into manifestations of the devil in the Andes. For the purpose of this presentation, I focus on the Quechua term supay, used to refer in general terms to the Andean lord of the underworld who was also described as a ghostly entity, and one of its variants, hapuñuñu, understood as a female agent of evil. By analyzing the intricacies of the possible original meanings of supay before the arrival of the Spaniards, and its distortion in the subsequent European colonization, I seek to understand how the Andean sacred provided a convenient translation to refer to the devil in the Andes


 
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