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Politics and the Press Corps: Reporters, State Legislative Institutions, and Context

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Abstract:

How do differences in institutional and social contexts affect press-government relations and political journalism in the U.S.? Despite a widespread recognition that journalists and the stories they write affect the public agenda, policy options, and the frames through which people understand public policy, we know precious little about how political reporters do their jobs or patterns of press/government relations. Even with recent interest in press relations in Congress, little research has compared political reporters’ behavior across institutional and social contexts. In this paper, we examine how institutions affect the politics of newsgathering in American statehouse journalism. We focus on the presence or absence of term limits for lawmakers, the level of professionalization of state legislative bodies, and the overall size of the press corps. Using the comparative method, we carefully selected four state capitals: Columbus, Ohio; Indianapolis, Indiana; Lansing, Michigan; and Springfield, Illinois. We find that the attributes of legislative and press corps organization influence how journalists cover the story of government.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

report (228), state (164), polit (95), legisl (78), inform (75), press (67), term (67), limit (67), legislatur (66), time (59), sourc (56), stori (55), peopl (55), news (52), bureaus (41), cover (40), one (39), profession (37), corp (36), know (36), relationship (35),

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political journalism, reporters, government/press connection, state politics
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Name: American Political Science Association
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Cooper, Christopher. and Johnson, Martin. "Politics and the Press Corps: Reporters, State Legislative Institutions, and Context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2013-12-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151743_index.html>

APA Citation:

Cooper, C. A. and Johnson, M. , 2006-08-31 "Politics and the Press Corps: Reporters, State Legislative Institutions, and Context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2013-12-16 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p151743_index.html

Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: How do differences in institutional and social contexts affect press-government relations and political journalism in the U.S.? Despite a widespread recognition that journalists and the stories they write affect the public agenda, policy options, and the frames through which people understand public policy, we know precious little about how political reporters do their jobs or patterns of press/government relations. Even with recent interest in press relations in Congress, little research has compared political reporters’ behavior across institutional and social contexts. In this paper, we examine how institutions affect the politics of newsgathering in American statehouse journalism. We focus on the presence or absence of term limits for lawmakers, the level of professionalization of state legislative bodies, and the overall size of the press corps. Using the comparative method, we carefully selected four state capitals: Columbus, Ohio; Indianapolis, Indiana; Lansing, Michigan; and Springfield, Illinois. We find that the attributes of legislative and press corps organization influence how journalists cover the story of government.

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Associated Document Available American Political Science Association

Document Type: application/pdf
Page count: 40
Word count: 12791
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Politics and the Press Corps: Reporters State Legislative Institutions and Context Christopher A. Cooper Assistant Professor Western Carolina University Martin Johnson Assistant Professor University of California Riverside Abstract How do differences in institutional and social contexts affect press-government relations and political journalism in the U.S.? Despite a widespread recognition that journalists and the stories they write affect the public agenda policy options and the frames through which people understand public policy we know precious little about how political reporters
of Newsmen's Notions of Objectivity.” American Journal of Sociology 77:660-679. Weaver David H. and G. Cleveland Wilhoit. 1996. The American Journalist in the 1990s. Mahwah NJ: LEA West Sharon Crook. 1994. “The News Media in Ohio Politics.” In Alexander Lamis ed. Ohio Politics. Kent OH: Kent State University Press pp181-195. Zaller John. 2003 “A New Standard of News Quality: Burglar Alarms for the Monitorial Citizen.” Political Communication 20:109-130. Zaller John. 1999. A Theory of Media Politics: How the Interests


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