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The Blame Game: A First Glimpse at the Socially Acceptable Causes of Female Fatness

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Abstract:

Fatism remains one of the last acceptable prejudices in the United States. For women, weight is a defining, if not the defining, characteristic. Due to the importance and value that society and media have placed on physical appearance, and in particular weight, a woman's weight communicates who she is as a person. Unfortunately, what her weight communicates includes a whole host of negative stereotypes that reflect the anti-fat bias that is deeply embedded in American culture. This bias, according to some, is based on the belief that weight is an entirely controllable factor. This study explores whether there exist any conditions under which female fatness is considered socially acceptable. Findings generated from thematic analysis suggest that while there exists a handful of "acceptable" causes of female fatness, generalized dislike of obese women might be an even bigger issue that the overweight female population must face.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

fat (97), obes (87), particip (64), social (55), blame (55), femal (53), accept (52), condit (52), weight (48), women (46), respons (38), woman (31), game (30), control (27), one (26), research (24), data (21), relat (21), categori (20), caus (20), identifi (19),

Author's Keywords:

Women, Obesity, Social Stigma, Social Desirability, Body Image, Weight Controllability, Responsibility and Blame
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172822_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Triplett, Laura. "The Blame Game: A First Glimpse at the Socially Acceptable Causes of Female Fatness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172822_index.html>

APA Citation:

Triplett, L. , 2007-05-23 "The Blame Game: A First Glimpse at the Socially Acceptable Causes of Female Fatness" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA Online <PDF>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p172822_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Fatism remains one of the last acceptable prejudices in the United States. For women, weight is a defining, if not the defining, characteristic. Due to the importance and value that society and media have placed on physical appearance, and in particular weight, a woman's weight communicates who she is as a person. Unfortunately, what her weight communicates includes a whole host of negative stereotypes that reflect the anti-fat bias that is deeply embedded in American culture. This bias, according to some, is based on the belief that weight is an entirely controllable factor. This study explores whether there exist any conditions under which female fatness is considered socially acceptable. Findings generated from thematic analysis suggest that while there exists a handful of "acceptable" causes of female fatness, generalized dislike of obese women might be an even bigger issue that the overweight female population must face.

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