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Lake Okeechobee Watershed Management, Planning and Implementation

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Abstract:

Lake Okeechobee is a valuable resource to South Florida and an integral component of the fragile Kissimmee, Everglades’s ecosystem. In 2000, the Florida Legislature enacted the Lake Okeechobee Protection Act (LOPA) Fla. Stat. §373.4595 and the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Fla. Stat. §373.4595(3) (a) two comprehensive statutory programs established to restore Lake Okeechobee. The primary goal of these programs is to achieve the phosphorus TMDL for the Lake of 140 metric tons by 2015. A requirement of LOPA is the development of a strategic plan to improve the health of the Lake and specifically meet the Lake’s phosphorus TMDL. In 2004 the Lake Okeechobee Protection Plan (LOPP) was presented to the Florida Legislature. Projects being implemented include urban and agricultural BMPs, regional water storage systems, public private partnerships, regulatory programs, and continued research and monitoring. Recent storm events along with changes in land use throughout the watershed have made it difficult for resource managers to measure successes in phosphorus reductions resulting from the initial program implementation. As such, the Govenor initiated expanding the scope of the LOPP and accelerated the implementation process through the Lake Okeechobee and Estuary Recovery (LOER) project. Design and construction of regional water storage projects and stormwater treatment areas, implementation of BMPs, and refinement of regulatory programs, are being fast tracked to address increased phosphorus loadings to the Lake and reduce freshwater flows to the estuaries. Accelerating these programs will help resource managers reach the Lake’s TMDL by 2015, future mandated tributary TMDLs, and move one step closer to the restoration of the entire Kissimmee, Okeechobee, Everglades ecosystem.

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lake (11), okeechobe (6), program (6), implement (5), phosphorus (4), tmdl (4), manag (4), florida (4), environment (3), plan (3), ph.d (3), water (3), lead (3), scientist (3), resourc (3), storag (2), protect (2), south (2), lopp (2), project (2), stat (2),
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Association:
Name: SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY
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http://www.swcs.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173517_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ritter, Gary., Zhang, Joyce., James, R. and Sharfstein, Bruce. "Lake Okeechobee Watershed Management, Planning and Implementation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Saddlebrook Resort, Tampa, Florida, Jul 21, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173517_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ritter, G. J., Zhang, J. J., James, R. T. and Sharfstein, B. , 2007-07-21 "Lake Okeechobee Watershed Management, Planning and Implementation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, Saddlebrook Resort, Tampa, Florida Online <PDF>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p173517_index.html

Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Abstract: Lake Okeechobee is a valuable resource to South Florida and an integral component of the fragile Kissimmee, Everglades’s ecosystem. In 2000, the Florida Legislature enacted the Lake Okeechobee Protection Act (LOPA) Fla. Stat. §373.4595 and the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Fla. Stat. §373.4595(3) (a) two comprehensive statutory programs established to restore Lake Okeechobee. The primary goal of these programs is to achieve the phosphorus TMDL for the Lake of 140 metric tons by 2015. A requirement of LOPA is the development of a strategic plan to improve the health of the Lake and specifically meet the Lake’s phosphorus TMDL. In 2004 the Lake Okeechobee Protection Plan (LOPP) was presented to the Florida Legislature. Projects being implemented include urban and agricultural BMPs, regional water storage systems, public private partnerships, regulatory programs, and continued research and monitoring. Recent storm events along with changes in land use throughout the watershed have made it difficult for resource managers to measure successes in phosphorus reductions resulting from the initial program implementation. As such, the Govenor initiated expanding the scope of the LOPP and accelerated the implementation process through the Lake Okeechobee and Estuary Recovery (LOER) project. Design and construction of regional water storage projects and stormwater treatment areas, implementation of BMPs, and refinement of regulatory programs, are being fast tracked to address increased phosphorus loadings to the Lake and reduce freshwater flows to the estuaries. Accelerating these programs will help resource managers reach the Lake’s TMDL by 2015, future mandated tributary TMDLs, and move one step closer to the restoration of the entire Kissimmee, Okeechobee, Everglades ecosystem.

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Document Type: PDF
Page count: 1
Word count: 292
Text sample:
Lake Okeechobee Watershed Management Planning and Implementation Gary J. Ritter: Lead Environmental Scientist Joyce J. Zhang: Ph.D. P.E. Lead Engineer R. Thomas James: Ph.D. Sr. Supervising Environmental Scientist Bruce Sharfstein: Ph.D. Lead Environmental Scientist Lake Okeechobee is a valuable resource to South Florida and an integral component of the fragile Kissimmee Everglades’s ecosystem. In 2000 the Florida Legislature enacted the Lake Okeechobee Protection Act (LOPA) Fla. Stat. §373.4595 and the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Fla. Stat. §373.4595(3) (a)
the watershed have made it difficult for resource managers to measure successes in phosphorus reductions resulting from the initial program implementation. As such the South Florida Water Management District along with their partner agencies have expanded the scope of the LOPP and accelerated the implementation process through the Lake Okeechobee and Estuary Recovery (LOER) initiative. Design and construction of regional water storage projects and stormwater treatment areas implementation of BMPs and refinement of regulatory programs are being fast tracked


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