Citation

Human Rights and Private Wrongs: International and Local Campaigns Against Female Genital Mutilation

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

As aggrieved groups increasingly frame their grievances as human rights issues, new human rights norms are emerging that do not appear in the original United Nations human rights documents and covenants (Bob forthcoming). Many new rights emerge to confront ?private wrongs,? human rights abuses that are committed by non-state actors (Brysk 2005). Previous scholarship on human rights advocacy (Keck and Sikkink 1998, Risse, Ropp and Sikkink 1999) does not explain how new rights emerge or are accepted in the international human rights discourse. How do domestic and transnational human rights actors advocate for new rights that are not enshrined in UN human rights documents? How do they push for and achieve change on abuses that are perpetrated by non-state actors? This paper examines female genital mutilation (FGM) as a case of this intersection of private wrongs and new human rights. I use a three-part model for new rights development (Bob forthcoming) to analyze the struggle for international acceptance of FGM as a human rights issue. Using documents from intergovernmental organizations and US, African, and Middle Eastern NGOs, I trace the process of placing FGM on the international human rights agenda as well as the efforts to eradicate the practice at the local level. I find that gaining acceptance for FGM as a human rights issue required shifts in framing of the problem over time to resonate on the international level, and that additional advocacy and strategic framing of the issues back to the local level has been key to eradication success. This paper builds on recently emerging literature on the rise of new rights, and it illuminates the links between the international and local levels in an era of increasing private abuses of human rights.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

right (255), human (255), fgm (255), women (213), intern (197), issu (127), health (102), practic (101), frame (90), state (80), new (78), accept (63), privat (55), organ (53), local (52), cultur (50), work (49), baer (48), violat (44), advoc (43), level (40),
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.isanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178999_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Baer, Madeline. "Human Rights and Private Wrongs: International and Local Campaigns Against Female Genital Mutilation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2016-06-06 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178999_index.html>

APA Citation:

Baer, M. J. , 2007-02-28 "Human Rights and Private Wrongs: International and Local Campaigns Against Female Genital Mutilation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA Online <PDF>. 2016-06-06 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178999_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As aggrieved groups increasingly frame their grievances as human rights issues, new human rights norms are emerging that do not appear in the original United Nations human rights documents and covenants (Bob forthcoming). Many new rights emerge to confront ?private wrongs,? human rights abuses that are committed by non-state actors (Brysk 2005). Previous scholarship on human rights advocacy (Keck and Sikkink 1998, Risse, Ropp and Sikkink 1999) does not explain how new rights emerge or are accepted in the international human rights discourse. How do domestic and transnational human rights actors advocate for new rights that are not enshrined in UN human rights documents? How do they push for and achieve change on abuses that are perpetrated by non-state actors? This paper examines female genital mutilation (FGM) as a case of this intersection of private wrongs and new human rights. I use a three-part model for new rights development (Bob forthcoming) to analyze the struggle for international acceptance of FGM as a human rights issue. Using documents from intergovernmental organizations and US, African, and Middle Eastern NGOs, I trace the process of placing FGM on the international human rights agenda as well as the efforts to eradicate the practice at the local level. I find that gaining acceptance for FGM as a human rights issue required shifts in framing of the problem over time to resonate on the international level, and that additional advocacy and strategic framing of the issues back to the local level has been key to eradication success. This paper builds on recently emerging literature on the rise of new rights, and it illuminates the links between the international and local levels in an era of increasing private abuses of human rights.


Similar Titles:
Building U.S. Human Rights Culture from the Ground Up: International Human Rights Implementation at the Local Level

Globalisation, the State, and Local Indigenous Cultures: The Dynamics of the Discourses of Human Rights and Indigenous Women's Rights in Latin America

The influence of issue-characteristics on the levels of international “shaming” over Mexico: comparing the femicides in Ciudad Juárez and security-related violations of human rights


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.