Citation

Deterring the Iraqi Insurgency as a Market Entry/Exit Game

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

This paper is a policy analysis of the decision to disband the Iraqi security services and the role it played in the birth of many Iraqi insurgencies. The decision has been heavily criticized for fueling the insurgencies and dismantling institutions that were not loyal to the Baath party but were necessary for the post-war governance of Iraq. Those most heavily involved in the decision (Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Bremer) argue that the announcement of the disbandment of the Iraqi security services in May of 2003 was an official rubberstamp on the de facto situation of an Army that had entirely deserted. Their critics argue twofold. First, the Iraqi Army suffered massive desertions because the coalition army was too small to secure the Iraqi military units intact. Second, the Iraqi army could have been reconstituted had the coalition acted quickly and decisively. Thanks to recently released statements from critical retired generals, Paul Bremer?s book, and other primary source materials released by those involved in the decision, a picture of why the much criticized choice was made has begun to appear. The Rumsfeld Doctrine of a small and technologically-advanced force has proven effective in war-fighting, but too small for nation-building. The failure to govern large areas of Iraq created a market for security that could be filled by those with a comparative advantage in violence, former soldiers. Borrowing from economics literature on autarky, I intend to assess the decision to disband the Iraqi security services and its impact upon the birth of the insurgency as a synthetically created market for security.
Most Common Document Word Stems:

0 (1),
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.isanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180900_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Jones, Nathan. "Deterring the Iraqi Insurgency as a Market Entry/Exit Game" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2016-06-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180900_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jones, N. P. , 2007-02-28 "Deterring the Iraqi Insurgency as a Market Entry/Exit Game" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA Online <PDF>. 2016-06-08 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p180900_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper is a policy analysis of the decision to disband the Iraqi security services and the role it played in the birth of many Iraqi insurgencies. The decision has been heavily criticized for fueling the insurgencies and dismantling institutions that were not loyal to the Baath party but were necessary for the post-war governance of Iraq. Those most heavily involved in the decision (Donald Rumsfeld and Paul Bremer) argue that the announcement of the disbandment of the Iraqi security services in May of 2003 was an official rubberstamp on the de facto situation of an Army that had entirely deserted. Their critics argue twofold. First, the Iraqi Army suffered massive desertions because the coalition army was too small to secure the Iraqi military units intact. Second, the Iraqi army could have been reconstituted had the coalition acted quickly and decisively. Thanks to recently released statements from critical retired generals, Paul Bremer?s book, and other primary source materials released by those involved in the decision, a picture of why the much criticized choice was made has begun to appear. The Rumsfeld Doctrine of a small and technologically-advanced force has proven effective in war-fighting, but too small for nation-building. The failure to govern large areas of Iraq created a market for security that could be filled by those with a comparative advantage in violence, former soldiers. Borrowing from economics literature on autarky, I intend to assess the decision to disband the Iraqi security services and its impact upon the birth of the insurgency as a synthetically created market for security.


Similar Titles:
The Political Economy of the Iraqi Insurgency: Mobilizational Resources, Selective Incentives and Critical Masses

Games That Sell: Determining Factors That Explain the Success of Video Games in the U.S. Market

Political Marketing Games

Financial Crises and the Power of Capital in Emerging Market Economies: "Credibility" Game in Russia and the Czech Republic

Yard Games: Identity Economics and Moral Logics in a Market for Scrap Metal in Chicago


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.