Citation

State Feminism in Southern Africa: The Cases of Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Gender activists who espouse state feminism prioritize using government structures, resources, and institutions for the advancement and empowerment of women. Over 90% of countries worldwide now have some form of state agency focused on improving the quality of life for women. Most typically, this comes in the form of a national agency for women, such as a women?s ministry, department, or commission. Interest in state feminism has experienced a resurgence in the last decade, particularly in states undergoing democratization and political reform. The recent push toward state feminism is an interesting and unanticipated event, given the often-contentious relationship between feminist movements and state institutions. Rather than vilifying the state as an institution to resist, international feminists and gender advocates are developing ways to utilize state power and state resources to improve the quality of women?s lives. This project compares the use of state agencies for implementing gendered policy in three southern African cases. There are two models of state institutions favored by African women legislators. The first type, seen in Botswana and Namibia, is the centralized model that involves the creation of a single government department or ministry that focuses on policy implementation. The idea is that this centralized model will serve as the focal point for gender legislation and policy implementation for the government. South Africa has developed an alternative model, one that locates women's interests a dispersed national network of institutions in the executive branch, the parliament, and civil society. This paper examines (1) why gender advocates and women?s organizations in southern Africa made the choice to pursue insider-strategies for feminist change, (2) the challenges and opportunities of harnessing the state to alter both the quality of life for women as well as the social and political status of women in Africa, and (3) the implications of institutionalizing women?s movements within state structures.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.isanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181528_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Britton, Hannah. "State Feminism in Southern Africa: The Cases of Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2016-06-08 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181528_index.html>

APA Citation:

Britton, H. E. , 2007-02-28 "State Feminism in Southern Africa: The Cases of Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA <Not Available>. 2016-06-08 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181528_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Gender activists who espouse state feminism prioritize using government structures, resources, and institutions for the advancement and empowerment of women. Over 90% of countries worldwide now have some form of state agency focused on improving the quality of life for women. Most typically, this comes in the form of a national agency for women, such as a women?s ministry, department, or commission. Interest in state feminism has experienced a resurgence in the last decade, particularly in states undergoing democratization and political reform. The recent push toward state feminism is an interesting and unanticipated event, given the often-contentious relationship between feminist movements and state institutions. Rather than vilifying the state as an institution to resist, international feminists and gender advocates are developing ways to utilize state power and state resources to improve the quality of women?s lives. This project compares the use of state agencies for implementing gendered policy in three southern African cases. There are two models of state institutions favored by African women legislators. The first type, seen in Botswana and Namibia, is the centralized model that involves the creation of a single government department or ministry that focuses on policy implementation. The idea is that this centralized model will serve as the focal point for gender legislation and policy implementation for the government. South Africa has developed an alternative model, one that locates women's interests a dispersed national network of institutions in the executive branch, the parliament, and civil society. This paper examines (1) why gender advocates and women?s organizations in southern Africa made the choice to pursue insider-strategies for feminist change, (2) the challenges and opportunities of harnessing the state to alter both the quality of life for women as well as the social and political status of women in Africa, and (3) the implications of institutionalizing women?s movements within state structures.


Similar Titles:
Media, Civil Society and the State in Democratic Politics in Africa: The Case of South Africa

Building capacity of curriculum development in Southern Africa through the BEAR project: a case of Botswana & Namibia


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.