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Changing Times and Changing Views: Assessing Race and Gender Differences in Gender-Role Attitudes over a Three Decade Period

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Abstract:

Data from the National Opinion Research Center’s 1972 - 1998 General Social Survey (Hereafter, GSS) is used to assess trends in the interactive effects of gender and race on attitudes toward shifting gender-roles for women in contemporary U.S. society. Utilizing a composite index of traditionalism constructed from four questions measuring gender-role attitudes as a dependent variable, our analysis indicate greater acceptance of the changing gender-roles of women for younger respondents, those who have higher education, respondents with higher aggregate familial income, and non-South and urban residents. Furthermore, both the frequency of church attendance and type of church attended (liberal or conservative) are found to be associated with respondents’ level of acceptance of the changing gender roles of women. The interactive effects of race and gender on gender-role attitudes over time yield noteworthy results. In comparison to black males, white males and females, our findings indicate black females to be the least traditional, hence more accepting of the changing roles of women. That is to say, whereas White men, white women, and Black men show quite similar gender-role attitudes, each remained more traditional toward the changing gender-roles of women than Black females. Nonetheless, it is noteworthy that the differences that exist between the three and Black females, especially those between black and White females, appear to be declining over time.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

women (146), black (133), white (125), gender (123), attitud (108), role (103), chang (72), men (63), femal (61), male (60), gender-rol (55), social (53), race (44), toward (38), categori (37), tradit (34), 1 (33), differ (32), model (31), age (29), time (29),

Author's Keywords:

Race, Gender, Interaction
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Name: American Sociological Association
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http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183933_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Carter, James., Corra, Mamadi. and Holland, Laurel. "Changing Times and Changing Views: Assessing Race and Gender Differences in Gender-Role Attitudes over a Three Decade Period" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183933_index.html>

APA Citation:

Carter, J. S., Corra, M. and Holland, L. L. , 2007-08-11 "Changing Times and Changing Views: Assessing Race and Gender Differences in Gender-Role Attitudes over a Three Decade Period" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City Online <PDF>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183933_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Data from the National Opinion Research Center’s 1972 - 1998 General Social Survey (Hereafter, GSS) is used to assess trends in the interactive effects of gender and race on attitudes toward shifting gender-roles for women in contemporary U.S. society. Utilizing a composite index of traditionalism constructed from four questions measuring gender-role attitudes as a dependent variable, our analysis indicate greater acceptance of the changing gender-roles of women for younger respondents, those who have higher education, respondents with higher aggregate familial income, and non-South and urban residents. Furthermore, both the frequency of church attendance and type of church attended (liberal or conservative) are found to be associated with respondents’ level of acceptance of the changing gender roles of women. The interactive effects of race and gender on gender-role attitudes over time yield noteworthy results. In comparison to black males, white males and females, our findings indicate black females to be the least traditional, hence more accepting of the changing roles of women. That is to say, whereas White men, white women, and Black men show quite similar gender-role attitudes, each remained more traditional toward the changing gender-roles of women than Black females. Nonetheless, it is noteworthy that the differences that exist between the three and Black females, especially those between black and White females, appear to be declining over time.

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