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Young Kids at Home, Long Hours at Work: Gender Differences in the Health Consequences of Paid Work and Household Conditions

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Abstract:

In this paper, we explore gender differences and similarities in self-rated health trajectories for NSFH men and women who advanced into middle and older age between 1987/1988 and 2001/2002. Our conceptual model acknowledges the inherent physiological differences between and among males and females as well as the impact of social experiences in a stratified and gendered world. Using latent class growth curve models, we examine both measured and latent differences in the risk of poor health over time. We find no statistically significant gender differences in self-reported health trajectories. Our models reveal subgroups of men and women who differ not only in their risk for poor health over time, but the extent to which their health is affected by their resources, relationships, and behaviors. We conclude that childhood environments, health behaviors, employment conditions, household circumstances, and psychological resources are differentially associated with the self-reported health trajectories of men and women, as well as subgroups among men and among women.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

health (222), women (83), men (66), gender (65), social (60), differ (57), among (41), report (39), self (39), model (38), et (34), al (33), work (33), self-report (29), trajectori (29), 0.06 (27), cluster (26), behavior (26), life (25), measur (25), 0.07 (25),

Author's Keywords:

gender, health
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association
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http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184675_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hamil-Luker, Jenifer. and O'Rand, Angela. "Young Kids at Home, Long Hours at Work: Gender Differences in the Health Consequences of Paid Work and Household Conditions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184675_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hamil-Luker, J. and O'Rand, A. M. , 2007-08-11 "Young Kids at Home, Long Hours at Work: Gender Differences in the Health Consequences of Paid Work and Household Conditions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City Online <PDF>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p184675_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper, we explore gender differences and similarities in self-rated health trajectories for NSFH men and women who advanced into middle and older age between 1987/1988 and 2001/2002. Our conceptual model acknowledges the inherent physiological differences between and among males and females as well as the impact of social experiences in a stratified and gendered world. Using latent class growth curve models, we examine both measured and latent differences in the risk of poor health over time. We find no statistically significant gender differences in self-reported health trajectories. Our models reveal subgroups of men and women who differ not only in their risk for poor health over time, but the extent to which their health is affected by their resources, relationships, and behaviors. We conclude that childhood environments, health behaviors, employment conditions, household circumstances, and psychological resources are differentially associated with the self-reported health trajectories of men and women, as well as subgroups among men and among women.

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