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Childhood Aggression Over Time in American Indian, Caucasian, and Hispanic Children: Referred Versus Non-Referred Youth

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Abstract:

The empirical evidence has consistently shown that childhood aggression is a precursor of later delinquency (e.g., Brook et al., 1995; Harachi et al., 2006). However, few studies have examined whether ethnic/racial group membership moderates this association. The current investigation examined teacher reported child aggression (K-5th grade) on later referrals to the juvenile justice system by ethnic/racial group (American Indian, Caucasian, and Hispanic). Mean levels of children’s aggression were compared by official juvenile court status across groups. Furthermore, changes in mean levels of aggression were examined over time by racial/ethnic group in both the non-referred and referred groups. The sample included N = 4,622 ethnically diverse children (males and females) part of a large-scale violence prevention effort (Embry et al., 1996). Preliminary findings based on mean level comparisons over time by referral status provided evidence that levels of aggression remained largely stable over time across all three groups. Findings also indicated that for Caucasian and Hispanic children, mean levels of aggression were significantly different by referral status. However, this was not found for American Indian children. Additional analyses will focus on person-centered growth trajectories in aggression over time by referral status and across racial/ethnic groups.
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Name: AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY
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http://www.asc41.com


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201750_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Chen, Pan., Vazsonyi, Alexander. and Scarpate, J.. "Childhood Aggression Over Time in American Indian, Caucasian, and Hispanic Children: Referred Versus Non-Referred Youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 13, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201750_index.html>

APA Citation:

Chen, P. , Vazsonyi, A. T. and Scarpate, J. M. , 2007-11-13 "Childhood Aggression Over Time in American Indian, Caucasian, and Hispanic Children: Referred Versus Non-Referred Youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201750_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The empirical evidence has consistently shown that childhood aggression is a precursor of later delinquency (e.g., Brook et al., 1995; Harachi et al., 2006). However, few studies have examined whether ethnic/racial group membership moderates this association. The current investigation examined teacher reported child aggression (K-5th grade) on later referrals to the juvenile justice system by ethnic/racial group (American Indian, Caucasian, and Hispanic). Mean levels of children’s aggression were compared by official juvenile court status across groups. Furthermore, changes in mean levels of aggression were examined over time by racial/ethnic group in both the non-referred and referred groups. The sample included N = 4,622 ethnically diverse children (males and females) part of a large-scale violence prevention effort (Embry et al., 1996). Preliminary findings based on mean level comparisons over time by referral status provided evidence that levels of aggression remained largely stable over time across all three groups. Findings also indicated that for Caucasian and Hispanic children, mean levels of aggression were significantly different by referral status. However, this was not found for American Indian children. Additional analyses will focus on person-centered growth trajectories in aggression over time by referral status and across racial/ethnic groups.

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