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Jim Crow Meets John Bull: St. Clair Drake and the Pan African Community in Great Britain, 1946-1948

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Abstract:

In 1947, following the publication of Black Metropolis, Drake traveled to England to embark on a pioneering study race relations in the British Isles. In conducting field research in the Somali, West Indian, and native black working class seaport community of Tiger Bay in Cardiff and, to a lesser extent, black communities in Liverpool, Birmingham, Manchester, and London, Drake documented for the first time a range of religious and voluntary institutions around which black Britons organized themselves and the similar yet distinct systems of racial subordination that exposed them, like their black counterparts in Chicago’s south-side, to the promise and discontents of modernity. As a participant-observer of these communities, Drake came to learn of their post-war hopes and aspirations, discovering, in some instances, overt conflict with a Pan African agenda that was aggressively advanced by intellectuals and representative leadership figures at the national level on both sides of the Atlantic. Though supportive of Pan African initiatives in general, especially in the area of mobilizing broad-based support for democratic movements in Africa and United States, Drake research and activism during this period illuminates differences within this movement that professed to represent the interest of the African world. This paper will consider the internal tensions within the Pan African movement during this period through critically considering Drake’s experiences as a participant-observer of black communities at the local level in England in the early post-war period, before Pan-Africanism moved from its utopian stage to the ideology of the newly independent state of Ghana in 1957.

Author's Keywords:

St. Clair Drake, Pan Africanism, World War II, Sociology, Race Relations, Transnationalism, Internationalism, Diaspora
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Association:
Name: Association for the Study of African American Life and History
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p207156_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Rosa, Andrew. "Jim Crow Meets John Bull: St. Clair Drake and the Pan African Community in Great Britain, 1946-1948" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Atlanta Hilton, Charlotte, NC, Oct 02, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p207156_index.html>

APA Citation:

Rosa, A. J. , 2007-10-02 "Jim Crow Meets John Bull: St. Clair Drake and the Pan African Community in Great Britain, 1946-1948" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Atlanta Hilton, Charlotte, NC <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p207156_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: In 1947, following the publication of Black Metropolis, Drake traveled to England to embark on a pioneering study race relations in the British Isles. In conducting field research in the Somali, West Indian, and native black working class seaport community of Tiger Bay in Cardiff and, to a lesser extent, black communities in Liverpool, Birmingham, Manchester, and London, Drake documented for the first time a range of religious and voluntary institutions around which black Britons organized themselves and the similar yet distinct systems of racial subordination that exposed them, like their black counterparts in Chicago’s south-side, to the promise and discontents of modernity. As a participant-observer of these communities, Drake came to learn of their post-war hopes and aspirations, discovering, in some instances, overt conflict with a Pan African agenda that was aggressively advanced by intellectuals and representative leadership figures at the national level on both sides of the Atlantic. Though supportive of Pan African initiatives in general, especially in the area of mobilizing broad-based support for democratic movements in Africa and United States, Drake research and activism during this period illuminates differences within this movement that professed to represent the interest of the African world. This paper will consider the internal tensions within the Pan African movement during this period through critically considering Drake’s experiences as a participant-observer of black communities at the local level in England in the early post-war period, before Pan-Africanism moved from its utopian stage to the ideology of the newly independent state of Ghana in 1957.

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Similar Titles:
St. Clair Drake, Pan-Africanism, African Studies, and the Politics of Knowledge, 1945-1963

“I Have Grown up in the Pan African Orbit”: St. Clair Drake, African Studies, and the Struggles of the Black Scholar-Activist, 1945-1960

Rural community structure and crime in Great Britain: The first direct test of the systemic model


 
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