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Hu is in Charge: What for China Now?

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Abstract:

Will China become democratic? This is a critical question highly debated among scholars and pundits. While optimistic proponents suggest that China is experiencing a gradual or inevitable democratic transition, pessimists argue that China is either stagnating in its “trapped transition” or becoming a “resilient authoritarian regime.” One of the key issues of the debate focuses on different perceptions of the role of Chinese leaders in China’s democratization. This paper intends to shed some light on this widely debated question by exploring the belief systems of Hu/Wen. Using operational code analysis from political psychology, I examine public speeches and statements delivered by Hu and Wen especially regarding domestic issues from 2005-2007. I suggest that Hu and Wen as the fourth generation of China’s leadership share a similar belief system especially regarding domestic issues. Both of them have democratic-oriented beliefs perceiving a tolerant and cooperative political universe. In addition, both Hu and Wen are inclined to use cooperative and democratic means to achieve their political beliefs. However, both of them are weak in terms of implementing their political goals. China’s future as a democracy depends on whether Hu and Wen can consolidate their political power and strengthen their beliefs in order to lead the political transition.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

hu (138), polit (133), belief (110), 1 (104), wen (103), leader (90), p (89), china (68), domest (58), code (47), p-1 (44), democrat (44), oper (44), valu (39), 4 (38), i-1 (37), intern (36), leadership (33), parti (32), analysi (31), control (29),

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China, Operational Code, Beliefs, Political Psychology, Democratization, Leadership, China's Democracy
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Name: American Political Science Association
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MLA Citation:

Feng, Huiyun. "Hu is in Charge: What for China Now?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2013-12-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210160_index.html>

APA Citation:

Feng, H. , 2007-08-30 "Hu is in Charge: What for China Now?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2013-12-15 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p210160_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Will China become democratic? This is a critical question highly debated among scholars and pundits. While optimistic proponents suggest that China is experiencing a gradual or inevitable democratic transition, pessimists argue that China is either stagnating in its “trapped transition” or becoming a “resilient authoritarian regime.” One of the key issues of the debate focuses on different perceptions of the role of Chinese leaders in China’s democratization. This paper intends to shed some light on this widely debated question by exploring the belief systems of Hu/Wen. Using operational code analysis from political psychology, I examine public speeches and statements delivered by Hu and Wen especially regarding domestic issues from 2005-2007. I suggest that Hu and Wen as the fourth generation of China’s leadership share a similar belief system especially regarding domestic issues. Both of them have democratic-oriented beliefs perceiving a tolerant and cooperative political universe. In addition, both Hu and Wen are inclined to use cooperative and democratic means to achieve their political beliefs. However, both of them are weak in terms of implementing their political goals. China’s future as a democracy depends on whether Hu and Wen can consolidate their political power and strengthen their beliefs in order to lead the political transition.

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Document Type: application/pdf
Page count: 18
Word count: 7050
Text sample:
Hu is in Charge: What for China Now? Abstract: Will China become democratic? This is a critical question highly debated among scholars and pundits. While optimistic proponents suggest that China is experiencing a gradual or inevitable democratic transition pessimists argue that China is either stagnating in its “trapped transition” or becoming a “resilient authoritarian regime.” One of the key issues of the debate focuses on different perceptions of the role of Chinese leaders in China’s democratization. This paper intends
(two-tailed) P-1 4.334 .044 I-1 2.676 .110 P-4 .458 .502 Table 3-b: Wen’s key beliefs in an ANOVA analysis of difference over domestic and international issues Main Effects (N=37) Independent Factors F (1 36) P Value (two-tailed) P-1 10.684 .002 I-1 5.925 .020 P-4 .613 .439 18


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