Citation

Why Japanesr Are More Likely to Favor "Apology," While Americans Are More Likely to Favor "Thank You"

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

This study investigated which speech act is more preferred in favor asking between apologies and thanks in the US and Japan and further attempted to explore how positive and negative face concerns (Brown & Levinson, 1987) relate to preferences for apologies or thanks. For these goals, two survey studies were conducted. In study 1, 152 participants were asked to compose an email message for a situation where a favor was asked. In study 2, 634 participants were asked to fill out one of four versions of a questionnaire, which included a prototype of an email message for the situation described in study 1 and negative and positive face threats measurements. The findings showed that 1) a greater number of Japanese included apologies in their favor asking messages while a greater number of American messages contained, 2) Americans had stronger intentions to use thanks in their favor asking messages than did Japanese, whereas Japanese had stronger intentions to use an apology than Americans did, and 3) including an apology and/or thanks reduced the amount of some types of face threat perceived in favor asking message. Finally, implications and future research directions were discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

apolog (255), ask (211), face (195), thank (186), favor (183), messag (111), japanes (102), american (88), threat (87), use (83), cultur (79), gratitud (77), posit (76), h (73), negat (63), act (62), differ (61), studi (54), way (49), present (49), 2 (47),

Author's Keywords:

Cultural differences, apology, thanks, favor asking messages, Japan, the US, face work
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232588_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Lee, Hye Eun., Park, Hee Sun. and Imai, Tatsuya. "Why Japanesr Are More Likely to Favor "Apology," While Americans Are More Likely to Favor "Thank You"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 <Not Available>. 2017-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232588_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lee, H. , Park, H. and Imai, T. , 2008-05-21 "Why Japanesr Are More Likely to Favor "Apology," While Americans Are More Likely to Favor "Thank You"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2017-09-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232588_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study investigated which speech act is more preferred in favor asking between apologies and thanks in the US and Japan and further attempted to explore how positive and negative face concerns (Brown & Levinson, 1987) relate to preferences for apologies or thanks. For these goals, two survey studies were conducted. In study 1, 152 participants were asked to compose an email message for a situation where a favor was asked. In study 2, 634 participants were asked to fill out one of four versions of a questionnaire, which included a prototype of an email message for the situation described in study 1 and negative and positive face threats measurements. The findings showed that 1) a greater number of Japanese included apologies in their favor asking messages while a greater number of American messages contained, 2) Americans had stronger intentions to use thanks in their favor asking messages than did Japanese, whereas Japanese had stronger intentions to use an apology than Americans did, and 3) including an apology and/or thanks reduced the amount of some types of face threat perceived in favor asking message. Finally, implications and future research directions were discussed.


Similar Titles:
Culture, Positive and Negative Face Threats, and Apology Intention

Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences in Apology and Thank You Statements

Courage to Face the Truth: Positive, Negative and Mixed Affect as Predictors of Individuals’ Acceptance of Ego-Threatening Information in Prosocial Media Messages


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.