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Taiwan and ROC: A Critical Analysis of President Chen's Construction of Taiwan Identity in National Speeches, 2000-2007

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Abstract:

Names used to address Taiwan--such as taiwan and zhonghuamingguo (Republic of China [ROC])--are symbols defining Taiwan’s political realities, each with their own unique historical significance. Since his election in 2000, Taiwan's president Chen Shui-bien has had to alternate between taiwan and ROC to strike a balance among conflicting ideas about Taiwan’s national identity. The act is grounded in complex political discourse dictating that Taiwan must not be seen as separate from the Sinic world and simultaneously to respond to steadily rising Taiwanese consciousness. Facing intercessions by the United States and China, as well as ever-present domestic clashes, rhetorical exigency requires the president to fashion unique political discourse concerning what Taiwan is and ought to be. This study explores how these names and related expressions are used in Chen's public addresses to the nation and how their development reflects the struggle over Taiwan’s national identity.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

taiwan (255), chen (204), roc (164), speech (159), nation (148), presid (105), china (103), day (95), polit (67), peopl (66), address (53), new (51), name (46), year (46), republ (43), 2004 (43), time (43), use (42), 2005 (38), 2000 (38), rhetor (36),

Author's Keywords:

Political symbols, Taiwan identity, presidential speech, naming practices
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MLA Citation:

Chang, Hui-Ching. and Holt, Richard. "Taiwan and ROC: A Critical Analysis of President Chen's Construction of Taiwan Identity in National Speeches, 2000-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 22, 2008 <Not Available>. 2017-09-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p234267_index.html>

APA Citation:

Chang, H. and Holt, R. , 2008-05-22 "Taiwan and ROC: A Critical Analysis of President Chen's Construction of Taiwan Identity in National Speeches, 2000-2007" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Online <PDF>. 2017-09-25 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p234267_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Names used to address Taiwan--such as taiwan and zhonghuamingguo (Republic of China [ROC])--are symbols defining Taiwan’s political realities, each with their own unique historical significance. Since his election in 2000, Taiwan's president Chen Shui-bien has had to alternate between taiwan and ROC to strike a balance among conflicting ideas about Taiwan’s national identity. The act is grounded in complex political discourse dictating that Taiwan must not be seen as separate from the Sinic world and simultaneously to respond to steadily rising Taiwanese consciousness. Facing intercessions by the United States and China, as well as ever-present domestic clashes, rhetorical exigency requires the president to fashion unique political discourse concerning what Taiwan is and ought to be. This study explores how these names and related expressions are used in Chen's public addresses to the nation and how their development reflects the struggle over Taiwan’s national identity.


Similar Titles:
China’s Evolving Taiwan-Policies: Comparison of Three Case Periods, Taiwan’s Presidential Elections (1996, 2000, 2004)

A National Art of Names? The 1919 Name-Change Law and Identity Politics in 1919-1921 Fiume


 
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