Citation

Developing Water Erosion Risk Indicator for Use on Agricultural Landscapes in Canada

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles



Abstract:

The Water Erosion Risk Indicator (WaterERI) is one of the agri-environmental indicators (AEIs) in the National Agri-Environmental Health Analysis and Reporting Program (NAHARP) in Canada. The previous version of WaterERI was based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) science, which does not account for the interactions between individual factors and can not predict possible soil accumulation in the lower-slope and depression areas. The Revised USLE version 2 (RUSLE2) and the Water Erosion Prediction Program (WEPP) overcome these shortcomings, but the structures of these two models are too complicated for a risk indicator and the databases required to drive these two models are not available in Canada.
The current version of WaterERI was developed to retain the ready applicability of USLE but capture the important advancements in erosion science contained in RUSLE2. Based on intensive RUSLE2 runs using the data of the US counties along the US-Canada boarder, interactions between the USLE factors were examined and predicted with regression equations. Soil accumulation rates in the lower-slope and depression areas were determined for given landform types based on the RUSLE2 predictions. The WaterERI predictions agreed well with those predicted by RUSLE2 and WEPP. The application of WaterERI showed that, in general, the water erosion risk in Canada decreased substantially since the adoption of conservation tillage and no-till systems. The procedures taken in developing the WaterERI may also be useful for enhancing USLE-based water erosion estimations where the databases for RUSLE2 are not available and/or when simple tabulate-format-model is required.
Keywords: Water erosion; WaterERI; NAHARP; RUSLE2; WEPP
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY
URL:
http://www.swcs.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235521_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Li, Sheng., McConkey, Brian., Black, James. and Lobb, David. "Developing Water Erosion Risk Indicator for Use on Agricultural Landscapes in Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, TBA, Tucson, Arizona, Jul 26, 2008 <Not Available>. 2013-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235521_index.html>

APA Citation:

Li, S. , McConkey, B. G., Black, J. M. and Lobb, D. , 2008-07-26 "Developing Water Erosion Risk Indicator for Use on Agricultural Landscapes in Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY, TBA, Tucson, Arizona <Not Available>. 2013-12-14 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235521_index.html

Publication Type: Oral Presentation
Abstract: The Water Erosion Risk Indicator (WaterERI) is one of the agri-environmental indicators (AEIs) in the National Agri-Environmental Health Analysis and Reporting Program (NAHARP) in Canada. The previous version of WaterERI was based on the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) science, which does not account for the interactions between individual factors and can not predict possible soil accumulation in the lower-slope and depression areas. The Revised USLE version 2 (RUSLE2) and the Water Erosion Prediction Program (WEPP) overcome these shortcomings, but the structures of these two models are too complicated for a risk indicator and the databases required to drive these two models are not available in Canada.
The current version of WaterERI was developed to retain the ready applicability of USLE but capture the important advancements in erosion science contained in RUSLE2. Based on intensive RUSLE2 runs using the data of the US counties along the US-Canada boarder, interactions between the USLE factors were examined and predicted with regression equations. Soil accumulation rates in the lower-slope and depression areas were determined for given landform types based on the RUSLE2 predictions. The WaterERI predictions agreed well with those predicted by RUSLE2 and WEPP. The application of WaterERI showed that, in general, the water erosion risk in Canada decreased substantially since the adoption of conservation tillage and no-till systems. The procedures taken in developing the WaterERI may also be useful for enhancing USLE-based water erosion estimations where the databases for RUSLE2 are not available and/or when simple tabulate-format-model is required.
Keywords: Water erosion; WaterERI; NAHARP; RUSLE2; WEPP

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION SOCIETY
Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.


Similar Titles:
Engineering expertise in the case of developing risk assessment for potable water supply to Australia’s remote, indigenous communities.

Development and Assessment of the Gender Equality Indicator in Agriculture (GEIA)

Vegetation and Soil Properties as Indicators of Hydrology of Wetlands in Agricultural and Natural Landscapes


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.