Citation

At the Edge of Classicism: Adam Smith’s Sentiments and Gabriel Tarde’s Monads

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

The aim of this paper is (1) to reflect upon the idea of a sociological canon and (2) to explore the relationship between its making and the rise of the social. Both reflection and exploration are carried out by analyzing two works often portrayed as peripheral to the canon and the dominant discourse on the social: Smith’s "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" (1759) and Tarde’s "Monadologie et sociologie" (1893). By underlying their centrality for current debates in the social sciences, I seek to demonstrate that they challenge the idea of a disciplinary canon. A key reason is found in how the authors understood one of the discipline’s central concepts: The social. I identify a common explanatory mechanism in both works, which provided a thought space for an “external metaphor” that could be perceived not as religious in nature, but rather as a secular one. It was this new secular space what progressively emerged as the modern notion of society. Smithian sentiments and Tardian monads functioned ultimately as external metaphors that placed the source of individual action outside the self. Although both, sentiments and monads, served as sources of the social, neither Smith nor Tarde located causality on structural forces, but rather on human interdependence and interaction.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

social (115), de (84), tard (72), societi (63), la (58), l (57), monad (56), et (55), d (53), smith (53), les (50), spectat (45), self (43), imparti (43), extern (41), human (40), des (39), individu (38), metaphor (36), sentiment (35), could (34),

Author's Keywords:

Social theory, history of sociology, the social, Adam Smith, Gabriel Tarde, sentiments, monads
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242547_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Santana Acuna, Alvaro. "At the Edge of Classicism: Adam Smith’s Sentiments and Gabriel Tarde’s Monads" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-12-01 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242547_index.html>

APA Citation:

Santana Acuna, A. A. , 2008-07-31 "At the Edge of Classicism: Adam Smith’s Sentiments and Gabriel Tarde’s Monads" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA Online <PDF>. 2014-12-01 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242547_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The aim of this paper is (1) to reflect upon the idea of a sociological canon and (2) to explore the relationship between its making and the rise of the social. Both reflection and exploration are carried out by analyzing two works often portrayed as peripheral to the canon and the dominant discourse on the social: Smith’s "The Theory of Moral Sentiments" (1759) and Tarde’s "Monadologie et sociologie" (1893). By underlying their centrality for current debates in the social sciences, I seek to demonstrate that they challenge the idea of a disciplinary canon. A key reason is found in how the authors understood one of the discipline’s central concepts: The social. I identify a common explanatory mechanism in both works, which provided a thought space for an “external metaphor” that could be perceived not as religious in nature, but rather as a secular one. It was this new secular space what progressively emerged as the modern notion of society. Smithian sentiments and Tardian monads functioned ultimately as external metaphors that placed the source of individual action outside the self. Although both, sentiments and monads, served as sources of the social, neither Smith nor Tarde located causality on structural forces, but rather on human interdependence and interaction.


Similar Titles:
The Social Science Toolkit: Developing Learning Resources for Online Student Success in Sociology and Social Sciences

The Human Subject in International Studies: An Outline of Research Programmes Extending to the Humanities, Sciences and Social Sciences

Law and Society Pedagogy: Social Science or Humanities?

The Degradation of Human Interaction Has Arrived; Impact of Social Jurisdiction Upon Society


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.