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High-Wage Earnings Growth and Rising Inequality in the United States:Shifting Industry, Occupation, Class and Local Labor Market Effects, 1983-2000

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Abstract:

Sociological studies of rising inequality often focus on the changing dynamics of middle- and low-wage work even though high-wage earnings gains are primarily responsible for recent trends. This paper focuses on high-wage workers’ compensation by examining the changing distribution of earners at or above the 90th percentile across industries, occupations, classes and local labor markets. Using CPS-MORG data from 1983-2000 I find that as high-wage workers’ earnings have increased, they have become more dispersed across industries. High-wage workers are increasingly concentrated in managerial occupations but logistic regression shows that class (EGP) is a better predictor of the likelihood of earning at or above the 90th percentile than occupation. Class status has a large but fairly stable effect on the likelihood of high-wage earnings, and accounts for close to half of the effect of increasing returns to higher education. Labor market size is a significant predictor of high-wage earnings, and exhibits the sharpest growth in explanatory power across the period. These findings are consistent with the rents, shareholder value, urban economic and matching perspectives on rising earnings inequality.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

wage (132), high (129), earn (121), high-wag (102), 19 (84), industri (71), inequ (69), worker (61), class (58), 1983 (52), labor (52), servic (51), market (49), increas (42), occup (41), earner (39), tabl (32), 90th (32), 1 (31), percentil (30), effect (30),

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Inequality, occupations, class, high-wage workers
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Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242769_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Hanley, Caroline. "High-Wage Earnings Growth and Rising Inequality in the United States:Shifting Industry, Occupation, Class and Local Labor Market Effects, 1983-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-12-01 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242769_index.html>

APA Citation:

Hanley, C. E. , 2008-07-31 "High-Wage Earnings Growth and Rising Inequality in the United States:Shifting Industry, Occupation, Class and Local Labor Market Effects, 1983-2000" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-12-01 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242769_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Sociological studies of rising inequality often focus on the changing dynamics of middle- and low-wage work even though high-wage earnings gains are primarily responsible for recent trends. This paper focuses on high-wage workers’ compensation by examining the changing distribution of earners at or above the 90th percentile across industries, occupations, classes and local labor markets. Using CPS-MORG data from 1983-2000 I find that as high-wage workers’ earnings have increased, they have become more dispersed across industries. High-wage workers are increasingly concentrated in managerial occupations but logistic regression shows that class (EGP) is a better predictor of the likelihood of earning at or above the 90th percentile than occupation. Class status has a large but fairly stable effect on the likelihood of high-wage earnings, and accounts for close to half of the effect of increasing returns to higher education. Labor market size is a significant predictor of high-wage earnings, and exhibits the sharpest growth in explanatory power across the period. These findings are consistent with the rents, shareholder value, urban economic and matching perspectives on rising earnings inequality.


Similar Titles:
Service Regimes and Wage Inequality in Metropolitan Labor Markets, 1970-2000

Demographic Composition and Occupational Wages: Reciprocal Effects across British Regional Labor Markets, 1994-2009

Labor Market Conditions and the Occupational Variation of Earnings Inequality in the United States


 
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