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A Multilevel Analysis of the Effect of Household Income Equality in Classes on Adolescent Stresses in South Korea

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Abstract:

This paper examines how household income inequality in classes has effects on adolescent stresses by using a multilevel model. Based on 2,898 sophomore middle school students(corresponding to eighth grade in United States) included in the Korean Youth Panel Survey (KYPS), we examined five distinctive types of stresses: economic, friendship, parental, study, and appearance. Multilevel models reveals two different ways by which household income inequality in classes changes the stress level of individual students. First, more equal classes in terms of household income lower the level of economic and friendship stress. Thus, students in more equal-income classes had lower economic and friendship stresses on average even after controlling for individual-level characteristics (or level-1 variables in multilevel model). However, for the parental stress, equality reveals interacting effect with perceived economic hardship of students. Perceived economic hardship increases the level of the parental stresses but its effect is also dependent on equality level in classes. More equal classes somehow lighten the effect of perceived economic hardship and thus, decrease the level of parental stresses. Other multilevel analyses revealed that there is no effect of inequality on study and appearance stress The results confirm two important issues when we study adolescent stresses. First, we need to study different stresses separately because the mechanism to produce, buffer, maintain, and change stresses could be different. Second, inequality in classes turned out to be essential to predict stress levels of individual students. Especially, it changes the average level of stresses (change of intercept in a multilevel model) for some types of stresses while it change the effect of other factors (change of slopes in a multilevel model) for other types of stresses.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

incom (113), level (106), class (101), stress (98), inequ (63), school (63), health (62), adolesc (57), econom (46), vs (42), effect (37), parent (31), individu (31), studi (30), p (28), 1 (28), equal (28), variabl (27), perceiv (26), household (26), hardship (26),

Author's Keywords:

Adolescent, Stress, Inequality, Multilevel Analysis
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Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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MLA Citation:

Lee, Kuen., Jung, Woo Seok. and Youm, Yoosik. "A Multilevel Analysis of the Effect of Household Income Equality in Classes on Adolescent Stresses in South Korea" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 <Not Available>. 2014-12-01 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243139_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lee, K. B., Jung, W. and Youm, Y. , 2008-07-31 "A Multilevel Analysis of the Effect of Household Income Equality in Classes on Adolescent Stresses in South Korea" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA Online <PDF>. 2014-12-01 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243139_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines how household income inequality in classes has effects on adolescent stresses by using a multilevel model. Based on 2,898 sophomore middle school students(corresponding to eighth grade in United States) included in the Korean Youth Panel Survey (KYPS), we examined five distinctive types of stresses: economic, friendship, parental, study, and appearance. Multilevel models reveals two different ways by which household income inequality in classes changes the stress level of individual students. First, more equal classes in terms of household income lower the level of economic and friendship stress. Thus, students in more equal-income classes had lower economic and friendship stresses on average even after controlling for individual-level characteristics (or level-1 variables in multilevel model). However, for the parental stress, equality reveals interacting effect with perceived economic hardship of students. Perceived economic hardship increases the level of the parental stresses but its effect is also dependent on equality level in classes. More equal classes somehow lighten the effect of perceived economic hardship and thus, decrease the level of parental stresses. Other multilevel analyses revealed that there is no effect of inequality on study and appearance stress The results confirm two important issues when we study adolescent stresses. First, we need to study different stresses separately because the mechanism to produce, buffer, maintain, and change stresses could be different. Second, inequality in classes turned out to be essential to predict stress levels of individual students. Especially, it changes the average level of stresses (change of intercept in a multilevel model) for some types of stresses while it change the effect of other factors (change of slopes in a multilevel model) for other types of stresses.


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