Citation

Seeing Hawai‘i Statehood: Cultural Politics at the Intersections of Race and Indigeneity

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Hawai‘i Territorial Senator Kamokila Campbell was a public spokesperson for the suppressed voices of Native Hawaiian opposition to Hawai‘i statehood and perhaps for this she has become an obscure figure in Hawai‘i’s history. In 1946, the first Congressional hearings on statehood since World War II were held at ‘Iolani Palace. Aware that Kamokila’s testimony would be opposed to statehood, the committee attempted to squeeze her into an afternoon with other witnesses. Kamokila protested, stating she needed more time to prepare her graphs and was determined to testify on January 17th, the date of the U.S. supported overthrow in 1893. Choosing to wear the colors of Hawaiian royalty, Kamokila spoke for two hours to thunderous applause. Her concerns were over the numerical dominance of Japanese Americans and the monopoly of power by the Big Five—five interlocking corporations that dominated Hawai‘i—and their effects on further displacing Native Hawaiians.

Current historical scholarship narrates Hawai‘i statehood as a triumph of Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians united against state racism. Kamokila’s testimony and other instances of Hawaiian opposition to statehood are examples of the "unexpected" historical "anomalies" that, as cultural historian Philip Deloria asserts, may not be so anomalous but instead, representative. By examining the frequency of these “secret histories,” we become better equipped to challenge dominant characterizations and assumptions of Native Hawaiians wholly embracing statehood and instead, write transformative and more dynamic histories of Hawai‘i statehood. This paper teases out the histories of political differences between the concepts of “race” and “indigeneity” within a context of colonialism.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Studies Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.theasa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243424_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Saranillio, Dean. "Seeing Hawai‘i Statehood: Cultural Politics at the Intersections of Race and Indigeneity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243424_index.html>

APA Citation:

Saranillio, D. "Seeing Hawai‘i Statehood: Cultural Politics at the Intersections of Race and Indigeneity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243424_index.html

Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Hawai‘i Territorial Senator Kamokila Campbell was a public spokesperson for the suppressed voices of Native Hawaiian opposition to Hawai‘i statehood and perhaps for this she has become an obscure figure in Hawai‘i’s history. In 1946, the first Congressional hearings on statehood since World War II were held at ‘Iolani Palace. Aware that Kamokila’s testimony would be opposed to statehood, the committee attempted to squeeze her into an afternoon with other witnesses. Kamokila protested, stating she needed more time to prepare her graphs and was determined to testify on January 17th, the date of the U.S. supported overthrow in 1893. Choosing to wear the colors of Hawaiian royalty, Kamokila spoke for two hours to thunderous applause. Her concerns were over the numerical dominance of Japanese Americans and the monopoly of power by the Big Five—five interlocking corporations that dominated Hawai‘i—and their effects on further displacing Native Hawaiians.

Current historical scholarship narrates Hawai‘i statehood as a triumph of Asian Americans and Native Hawaiians united against state racism. Kamokila’s testimony and other instances of Hawaiian opposition to statehood are examples of the "unexpected" historical "anomalies" that, as cultural historian Philip Deloria asserts, may not be so anomalous but instead, representative. By examining the frequency of these “secret histories,” we become better equipped to challenge dominant characterizations and assumptions of Native Hawaiians wholly embracing statehood and instead, write transformative and more dynamic histories of Hawai‘i statehood. This paper teases out the histories of political differences between the concepts of “race” and “indigeneity” within a context of colonialism.


Similar Titles:
Limiting Dissent: Asian American Cultural Politics at the Intersection of War, Empire and Race

Identity Politics and Local Political Culture: The Politics of Gender, Race, Class and Religion in Comparative Perspective

Resisting Intersectional Myopia within Feminist Scholarship Production: From the Politics of Location to the Politics that Deconstruct “Race” as a Cultural Category.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.