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ICE STORM IMPACTS ON THE CANOPY STRUCTURE OF A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST

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Abstract:

In 2005, we quantified changes in foliage-height profiles in the canopy of a northern hardwood forest at the 3,160 ha Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, after a severe ice storm in 1998. We predicted that the ice storm would allow increased American beech (Fagus grandifolia) recruitment and recovery, in part due to the prevalence of beech bark disease, which increased beech root sprouting prior to the storm. Data were collected in 15x15 m plots established in 1998 to assess storm damage, with 22 in damaged areas and 10 in undamaged control areas. Foliage-height profiles were created using a point-quadrat approach to sample leaf heights, and a pole-mounted leaf area index (LAI) sensor to measure LAI at 1 m intervals up to 10 m. We confirmed findings from 2000 that the total LAI in damaged areas had returned to estimated pre-storm levels, but found roughly 15% more of total LAI between 6-10 m in damaged canopies. By correlating leaf height and tree DBH, we determined that trees with DBH of 10-16 cm contributed the increased leaf area. Using vegetation inventory data from 1997 and 2002, we found a significantly greater increase in the density of beech with DBH of 10-16 cm in damaged areas. Foliage-height profiles can impact rates of transpiration and photosynthesis, canopy nutrient content, and bird community composition. Increased beech density is likely to decrease forest biomass, foliar concentrations of base cations and N, and the economic value of the forest.
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Association:
Name: International Congress for Conservation Biology
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http://www.conbio.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243765_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Weeks, Brian., Hamburg, Steven. and Vadeboncoeur, Matthew. "ICE STORM IMPACTS ON THE CANOPY STRUCTURE OF A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN, Jul 10, 2008 <Not Available>. 2013-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243765_index.html>

APA Citation:

Weeks, B. , Hamburg, S. and Vadeboncoeur, M. , 2008-07-10 "ICE STORM IMPACTS ON THE CANOPY STRUCTURE OF A NORTHERN HARDWOOD FOREST" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN <Not Available>. 2013-12-14 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p243765_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: In 2005, we quantified changes in foliage-height profiles in the canopy of a northern hardwood forest at the 3,160 ha Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, after a severe ice storm in 1998. We predicted that the ice storm would allow increased American beech (Fagus grandifolia) recruitment and recovery, in part due to the prevalence of beech bark disease, which increased beech root sprouting prior to the storm. Data were collected in 15x15 m plots established in 1998 to assess storm damage, with 22 in damaged areas and 10 in undamaged control areas. Foliage-height profiles were created using a point-quadrat approach to sample leaf heights, and a pole-mounted leaf area index (LAI) sensor to measure LAI at 1 m intervals up to 10 m. We confirmed findings from 2000 that the total LAI in damaged areas had returned to estimated pre-storm levels, but found roughly 15% more of total LAI between 6-10 m in damaged canopies. By correlating leaf height and tree DBH, we determined that trees with DBH of 10-16 cm contributed the increased leaf area. Using vegetation inventory data from 1997 and 2002, we found a significantly greater increase in the density of beech with DBH of 10-16 cm in damaged areas. Foliage-height profiles can impact rates of transpiration and photosynthesis, canopy nutrient content, and bird community composition. Increased beech density is likely to decrease forest biomass, foliar concentrations of base cations and N, and the economic value of the forest.

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