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UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL CONTEXT: MEASURING SOCIAL WELL-BEING AT THE ECOREGIONAL SCALE

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Abstract:

To effectively plan for large-scale conservation, conservation organizations must understand social conditions at the ecoregional scale. To describe the context for our work and understand the challenges and opportunities we face, we are measuring health, education, political empowerment, economic well-being, and culture in six landscapes: Coastal East Africa, Borneo, Namibia, Coral Triangle, Bering Sea, and the Terai Arc. Initial results suggest that relying on commonly used indicators – such as the Millennium Development Indicators – enables efficient data collection. However, data on other indicators of relevance to conservation, such as cultural practices or access to environmental education, do not always exist evenly across a large scale. Social data also typically correspond to political and/or administrative boundaries, which do not seamlessly match ecoregional boundaries. This creates methodological challenges to fit social data to the appropriate ecological scale, while maintaining data integrity. These results highlight the complexity and value of creating integrated conservation planning frameworks that effectively capture variable social conditions.
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Name: International Congress for Conservation Biology
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http://www.conbio.org


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MLA Citation:

Stephanson, Sheri., Claus, C.. and Mascia, Michael. "UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL CONTEXT: MEASURING SOCIAL WELL-BEING AT THE ECOREGIONAL SCALE" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN, Jul 10, 2008 <Not Available>. 2013-12-14 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244280_index.html>

APA Citation:

Stephanson, S. , Claus, C. A. and Mascia, M. , 2008-07-10 "UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL CONTEXT: MEASURING SOCIAL WELL-BEING AT THE ECOREGIONAL SCALE" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Congress for Conservation Biology, Convention Center, Chattanooga, TN <Not Available>. 2013-12-14 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244280_index.html

Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: To effectively plan for large-scale conservation, conservation organizations must understand social conditions at the ecoregional scale. To describe the context for our work and understand the challenges and opportunities we face, we are measuring health, education, political empowerment, economic well-being, and culture in six landscapes: Coastal East Africa, Borneo, Namibia, Coral Triangle, Bering Sea, and the Terai Arc. Initial results suggest that relying on commonly used indicators – such as the Millennium Development Indicators – enables efficient data collection. However, data on other indicators of relevance to conservation, such as cultural practices or access to environmental education, do not always exist evenly across a large scale. Social data also typically correspond to political and/or administrative boundaries, which do not seamlessly match ecoregional boundaries. This creates methodological challenges to fit social data to the appropriate ecological scale, while maintaining data integrity. These results highlight the complexity and value of creating integrated conservation planning frameworks that effectively capture variable social conditions.

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