Citation

Deadly Civics: Performing Citizenship, Latino Masculinities, and Military Service

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Jesús Suárez del Solar and Diego Rincón were two of the first Marines to die in Iraq. Both were non-citizen Latinos who were given posthumous citizenship by the US government. After their deaths, their fathers, Fernando Suárez del Solar and Jorge Rincón began advocating on their sons’ behalves on opposite sides of the war movement and did so by performing contrasting styles of masculinity. Jorge paraded his son’s Mustang in pro-military rallies. Fernando, embodying a very different masculinity, became a spokesperson for a peace organization. This paper investigates the performance of Latino immigrant masculinities in relation to American citizenship by examining the soldiers’ deaths, the activism of their fathers, journalistic accounts, and political speeches supporting changes to citizenship law. I argue that the ethnic and class character of the parties involved in the public discussion of the events and the passage of legislation put in motion parts of the national machinery that helped monitor symbolic membership (citizenship) and sovereignty in a racialized, gendered, and classed fashion. I find evidence of this in the discursive construction of military service as gateway to citizenship by journalists, politicians, soldiers, and some parents. The discourse of military service replicated media narratives that naturalized the armed forces as the prime public institution for Latinas/os to access middle-class status. This ideological positioning of the military echoes postcolonial and neocolonial realities across the globe and thus is partly at fault for reconstituting the subaltern status of Latinas/os. Hugely based on masculinist fantasies propagated by Latino and non-Latino media, these discourses and narratives discipline Latinos into ideas of civic service that are violent and deadly. Because the armed forces is the only public institution where Latino representation is in par with the Latino population, these discourses partly normalize Latinas/os’ lack of access to other public institutions such as quality public schooling, university, electoral politics, and healthcare. Opposing these hegemonic discourses are counter-hegemonic discourses based on broader ideas of civics, politics, activism, and masculinity, such as the one espoused by Fernando and other peace Latina/o activist. Fernando became a spokesperson for San-Francisco-based Global Exchange and has visited Iraq to bring medicines to under-serviced hospitals. In media, Fernando’s activism was portrayed as embodying a radically different masculinity than Jorge’s. Jorge, proudly displaying a hard masculinity, repeated to different media that he took his son to the recruitment office, and that he also volunteered but was not admitted because of his age. Contrariwise, Fernando, who often cried during interviews about his son, was often described by mainstream media as soft, soulful, and sad. I argue that Suárez’s use of the counter-discourse of pacifism, civics and citizenship became amenable to mainstream media because it was fused with marginalized forms of masculine performance. I conclude that these opposing performances of Latino immigrant civics were successfully mediated because they were framed within straight and feminized masculinity performance, thus re-articulating the link between hegemonic citizenship and racial patriarchy.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: American Studies Association Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.theasa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244542_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Amaya, Hector. "Deadly Civics: Performing Citizenship, Latino Masculinities, and Military Service" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244542_index.html>

APA Citation:

Amaya, H. "Deadly Civics: Performing Citizenship, Latino Masculinities, and Military Service" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p244542_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Jesús Suárez del Solar and Diego Rincón were two of the first Marines to die in Iraq. Both were non-citizen Latinos who were given posthumous citizenship by the US government. After their deaths, their fathers, Fernando Suárez del Solar and Jorge Rincón began advocating on their sons’ behalves on opposite sides of the war movement and did so by performing contrasting styles of masculinity. Jorge paraded his son’s Mustang in pro-military rallies. Fernando, embodying a very different masculinity, became a spokesperson for a peace organization. This paper investigates the performance of Latino immigrant masculinities in relation to American citizenship by examining the soldiers’ deaths, the activism of their fathers, journalistic accounts, and political speeches supporting changes to citizenship law. I argue that the ethnic and class character of the parties involved in the public discussion of the events and the passage of legislation put in motion parts of the national machinery that helped monitor symbolic membership (citizenship) and sovereignty in a racialized, gendered, and classed fashion. I find evidence of this in the discursive construction of military service as gateway to citizenship by journalists, politicians, soldiers, and some parents. The discourse of military service replicated media narratives that naturalized the armed forces as the prime public institution for Latinas/os to access middle-class status. This ideological positioning of the military echoes postcolonial and neocolonial realities across the globe and thus is partly at fault for reconstituting the subaltern status of Latinas/os. Hugely based on masculinist fantasies propagated by Latino and non-Latino media, these discourses and narratives discipline Latinos into ideas of civic service that are violent and deadly. Because the armed forces is the only public institution where Latino representation is in par with the Latino population, these discourses partly normalize Latinas/os’ lack of access to other public institutions such as quality public schooling, university, electoral politics, and healthcare. Opposing these hegemonic discourses are counter-hegemonic discourses based on broader ideas of civics, politics, activism, and masculinity, such as the one espoused by Fernando and other peace Latina/o activist. Fernando became a spokesperson for San-Francisco-based Global Exchange and has visited Iraq to bring medicines to under-serviced hospitals. In media, Fernando’s activism was portrayed as embodying a radically different masculinity than Jorge’s. Jorge, proudly displaying a hard masculinity, repeated to different media that he took his son to the recruitment office, and that he also volunteered but was not admitted because of his age. Contrariwise, Fernando, who often cried during interviews about his son, was often described by mainstream media as soft, soulful, and sad. I argue that Suárez’s use of the counter-discourse of pacifism, civics and citizenship became amenable to mainstream media because it was fused with marginalized forms of masculine performance. I conclude that these opposing performances of Latino immigrant civics were successfully mediated because they were framed within straight and feminized masculinity performance, thus re-articulating the link between hegemonic citizenship and racial patriarchy.


Similar Titles:
Classified and Depended Upon: Mandatory Military Service in the US, and the Dilemmas of Masculine Citizenship.

Memory of a Deadly Civics: Sacrifice, Latino Masculinities, and Military Service

A Different Shade of Patriotism: Latinos, Military Service, and Citizenship


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.