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Bienvenidos Fellow Americans!: Revisiting Puerto Rican Migration to Chicago, 1940-1966

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Abstract:

The migration and labor history of Puerto Ricans to Chicago speaks to the diverse experiences of Latinas/os across U.S. cities. This migration beginning in the 1940’s facilitated a labor need created by various factors, including the U.S.’ participation in military action abroad, the industrialization of the island of Puerto Rico, and also immigration limitations placed on other groups. Their unique status as U.S. citizens quickly differentiated them from other immigrant groups during this period, and initially affected the relationship between Puerto Ricans and the city of Chicago. In this paper I will discuss the ways in which Puerto Ricans were initially welcomed, discussed, and then racialized which came to aid the development of what Felix Padilla refers to as a “Puerto Rican consciousness”. As the numbers of Puerto Ricans in the city increased, the disenfranchisement felt by this community intensified, which in turn altered the way in which this group was viewed by the city of Chicago. During this time period, Puerto Rican students within city schools are also targeted by city officials, teachers, and the media as a way to facilitate the transition of Puerto Ricans into the American way of life. I will examine reports published and presented by both the Welfare Council of Chicago and the Mayor’s Committee on New Resident’s in the 1950’s and 1960’s, significantly affecting the ways in which Puerto Ricans established themselves within the city. With their reports both agencies contributed to a city wide awareness of this new group of migrants, educating wider social agencies on the perceived cultural differences inhabited by Puerto Ricans. Local media accounts from 1940 to 1966 will also aid in my discussion on this community of migrants initial relationship with the community in which they now came to inhabit.
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Association:
Name: American Studies Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.theasa.net


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p245040_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Velazquez, Mirelsie. "Bienvenidos Fellow Americans!: Revisiting Puerto Rican Migration to Chicago, 1940-1966" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico, <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p245040_index.html>

APA Citation:

Velazquez, M. "Bienvenidos Fellow Americans!: Revisiting Puerto Rican Migration to Chicago, 1940-1966" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency, Albuquerque, New Mexico <Not Available>. 2014-11-30 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p245040_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: The migration and labor history of Puerto Ricans to Chicago speaks to the diverse experiences of Latinas/os across U.S. cities. This migration beginning in the 1940’s facilitated a labor need created by various factors, including the U.S.’ participation in military action abroad, the industrialization of the island of Puerto Rico, and also immigration limitations placed on other groups. Their unique status as U.S. citizens quickly differentiated them from other immigrant groups during this period, and initially affected the relationship between Puerto Ricans and the city of Chicago. In this paper I will discuss the ways in which Puerto Ricans were initially welcomed, discussed, and then racialized which came to aid the development of what Felix Padilla refers to as a “Puerto Rican consciousness”. As the numbers of Puerto Ricans in the city increased, the disenfranchisement felt by this community intensified, which in turn altered the way in which this group was viewed by the city of Chicago. During this time period, Puerto Rican students within city schools are also targeted by city officials, teachers, and the media as a way to facilitate the transition of Puerto Ricans into the American way of life. I will examine reports published and presented by both the Welfare Council of Chicago and the Mayor’s Committee on New Resident’s in the 1950’s and 1960’s, significantly affecting the ways in which Puerto Ricans established themselves within the city. With their reports both agencies contributed to a city wide awareness of this new group of migrants, educating wider social agencies on the perceived cultural differences inhabited by Puerto Ricans. Local media accounts from 1940 to 1966 will also aid in my discussion on this community of migrants initial relationship with the community in which they now came to inhabit.


Similar Titles:
Anti-Imperialist and Transnational Social Work: Professional Women and Political Activism in Puerto Rican Communities, 1940-1975

Block is Beautiful: The Second Great Migration, The Chicago Urban League and Community Development in Chicago: 1940-1960

Cosmopolitan Puerto Rico: The Influences of Corsicans in Puerto Rican Identity and of Puerto Rican Women in Search of the American Dream

Baptism by Fire: Resistance and Community in Puerto Rican Chicago


 
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