All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

What the TAKS Test Can Teach Us About Our Students
Unformatted Document Text:  discourse on those principles. Though there is a legitimate resistance to any attempt to standardize assessments, there is a critical need in contemporary society to enhance the ability of citizens to deliberate effectively. Schools, colleges and university are uniquely suited to meet that need. It is after all one of our traditional responsibilities. An ongoing conversation about how this is best done, and active involvement in implementing it, ought to be a central part of what we do. References Deardorff, Michelle D. 2005. “Assessment Through the Grassroots: Assessing the Department via Student Peer Evaluation.” Journal of Political Science Education 1 (January-April): 109-126. Delli Carpini, Michael X and Scott Ketter. 1996. What Americans Know About Politics and Why it Matters. New Haven: Yale University Press. Egelko, Bob. San Francisco Chronicle. “Gonzales Says the Constitution Does Not Guarantee Habeas Corpus.” January 24, 2007. Gutman, Amy and Dennis Thomsom. 2004. Why Deliberative Democracy? Princeton NJ: Princeton University Press. Hepburn, Mary A. 1987. “Improving Political Science Education in the Schools: College-School Connections.” PS 20 (Summer): 691-697. Hibbing, John R. and Elizabeth Theiss-Morse. 1996. “Civics is Not Enough: Teaching Barbarics in K-12.” PS: Political Science and Politics 29 (March): 57-62 Hill, Jeffrey S. 2005. “Developing a Culture of Assessment: Insights from Theory and Experience.” Journal of Political Science Education 1 (January-April): 29-37. Kelly, Marisa and Brian E. Klunk. 2003. “Learning Assessment in Political Science Departments: Survey Results.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (July): 451-455. Luger, Stan and William Scheuerman. 1993. “Teaching American Government.” PS: Political Science and Politics 26 (December): 749-753. Macedo, Stephen. 2005. Democracy at Risk: How Political Choices Undermine Democratic Participation and What We Can Do About It. Washington DC: Brookings Institution. Nie, Norman H, Jane Junn and Kenneth Stehlik-Barry. 1996. Education and Democratic Citizenship in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 18

Authors: Jefferies, Kevin.
first   previous   Page 18 of 29   next   last



background image
discourse on those principles. Though there is a legitimate resistance to any attempt to
standardize assessments, there is a critical need in contemporary society to enhance the ability of
citizens to deliberate effectively. Schools, colleges and university are uniquely suited to meet
that need. It is after all one of our traditional responsibilities. An ongoing conversation about
how this is best done, and active involvement in implementing it, ought to be a central part of
what we do.
References
Deardorff, Michelle D. 2005. “Assessment Through the Grassroots: Assessing the Department
via Student Peer Evaluation.” Journal of Political Science Education 1 (January-April): 109-126.
Delli Carpini, Michael X and Scott Ketter. 1996. What Americans Know About Politics and Why
it Matters.
New Haven: Yale University Press.
Egelko, Bob. San Francisco Chronicle. “Gonzales Says the Constitution Does Not Guarantee
Habeas Corpus.” January 24, 2007.
Gutman, Amy and Dennis Thomsom. 2004. Why Deliberative Democracy? Princeton NJ:
Princeton University Press.
Hepburn, Mary A. 1987. “Improving Political Science Education in the Schools: College-School
Connections.” PS 20 (Summer): 691-697.
Hibbing, John R. and Elizabeth Theiss-Morse. 1996. “Civics is Not Enough: Teaching Barbarics
in K-12.” PS: Political Science and Politics 29 (March): 57-62
Hill, Jeffrey S. 2005. “Developing a Culture of Assessment: Insights from Theory and
Experience.” Journal of Political Science Education 1 (January-April): 29-37.
Kelly, Marisa and Brian E. Klunk. 2003. “Learning Assessment in Political Science
Departments: Survey Results.” PS: Political Science and Politics 36 (July): 451-455.
Luger, Stan and William Scheuerman. 1993. “Teaching American Government.” PS: Political
Science and Politics
26 (December): 749-753.
Macedo, Stephen. 2005. Democracy at Risk: How Political Choices Undermine Democratic
Participation and What We Can Do About It.
Washington DC: Brookings Institution.
Nie, Norman H, Jane Junn and Kenneth Stehlik-Barry. 1996. Education and Democratic
Citizenship in America.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
18


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.