All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Integrated Learning: Developing a Thematic Course and Internship Program in Washington DC
Unformatted Document Text:  The fact that Sam’s work experience overlapped with our course material did not happen by accident. The courses I led in the fall 2006 were part of the first semester of a new Washington DC Semester Program offered by The College of William & Mary. Although a main component of the program included an internship for each student, the William & Mary program (hereafter the DC program) is not solely, or even primarily an internship program. Instead it is an integrated learning experience including three William & Mary courses and an internship experience that complements that coursework. In this paper, I discuss and analyze the DC program’s development and implementation. One of the primary goals of the program was to ensure that the academic component of the DC experience was not secondary to the internship. That is, we strove to maintain the academic rigor students experience on William & Mary’s campus. The internships were seen as an extension of the learning students would undertake in their classes and in developing their own research during the semester. In addition to the DC program’s academic emphasis, the program is also distinct from many Washington DC internship programs in that it has a unique theme each semester. This theme requires that courses, internships and independent research are all aimed at understanding key questions related to the semester’s theme. The opportunity to spend a semester engaged in examining one broad topic has a number of benefits. Chief among them is that students are able to use and develop higher-level thinking skills at a much higher rate than is possible through a typical class on campus, or through a series of unrelated courses they might take with a more traditional internship program. Thus, here I argue that there are significant benefits to an academically integrated and thematic Washington DC program such as William & Mary’s. In the following 3

Authors: Nemacheck, Christine.
first   previous   Page 3 of 22   next   last



background image
The fact that Sam’s work experience overlapped with our course material did not
happen by accident. The courses I led in the fall 2006 were part of the first semester of a
new Washington DC Semester Program offered by The College of William & Mary.
Although a main component of the program included an internship for each student, the
William & Mary program (hereafter the DC program) is not solely, or even primarily an
internship program. Instead it is an integrated learning experience including three
William & Mary courses and an internship experience that complements that coursework.
In this paper, I discuss and analyze the DC program’s development and
implementation. One of the primary goals of the program was to ensure that the
academic component of the DC experience was not secondary to the internship. That is,
we strove to maintain the academic rigor students experience on William & Mary’s
campus. The internships were seen as an extension of the learning students would
undertake in their classes and in developing their own research during the semester.
In addition to the DC program’s academic emphasis, the program is also distinct
from many Washington DC internship programs in that it has a unique theme each
semester. This theme requires that courses, internships and independent research are all
aimed at understanding key questions related to the semester’s theme. The opportunity to
spend a semester engaged in examining one broad topic has a number of benefits. Chief
among them is that students are able to use and develop higher-level thinking skills at a
much higher rate than is possible through a typical class on campus, or through a series of
unrelated courses they might take with a more traditional internship program.
Thus, here I argue that there are significant benefits to an academically integrated
and thematic Washington DC program such as William & Mary’s. In the following
3


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.