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Teaching Experience and Teacher-Training Needs of Young Political Scientists
Unformatted Document Text:  overwhelming: out of 21 valid answers the teacher training and current institutions were the same in roughly half (9) of the cases. However, the percentage of PhD holders who perceived not attending training as a miss was actually lower (58%) than the percentage of doctoral students with the same opinion (68%). This indicate that the usefulness of trainings evaporate once one is established in an academic position. Although contradictory our previous argument, this can be the result of the fact that when one becomes an assistant professor, one has some teaching experience already, making such a training less crucial. Nonetheless, still the majority of PhD holders indicated a preference for training. There are some interesting findings with respect to gender even if many of them are not unexpected. There is no difference in the number of women and men who completed teacher training (34%). But while 14% of junior male scholars did not pass training despite of having an opportunity, only 5% of female informants wasted this opportunity. Male and female respondents had identical perception about the usefulness of the training they attended. But conforming to the trend above, more female political scientists regretted the fact that they had not attended any training (71% as opposed to 62% of males). Various explanations are possible. To name a few, it may be that more women plan to remain in academia than their male colleagues, therefore, they see training as more vital for their future career. However, there were no difference in the career plans of male and female respondents 49% of men and 50% of women respondents imagine their future within academia. Another possible explanation is that women may consider themselves disadvantaged in the male-dominated academic labor market. That is, they wish to increase their qualifications. Unfortunately, our evidence with respect to this issue is scant as we did not ask respondents to evaluate the usefulness of such qualifications on their chances of getting an academic job. 13

Authors: Simon, Eszter. and Pleschova, Gabriela.
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overwhelming: out of 21 valid answers the teacher training and current institutions were the
same in roughly half (9) of the cases. However, the percentage of PhD holders who perceived not
attending training as a miss was actually lower (58%) than the percentage of doctoral students
with the same opinion (68%). This indicate that the usefulness of trainings evaporate once one is
established in an academic position. Although contradictory our previous argument, this can be
the result of the fact that when one becomes an assistant professor, one has some teaching
experience already, making such a training less crucial. Nonetheless, still the majority of PhD
holders indicated a preference for training.
There are some interesting findings with respect to gender even if many of them are not
unexpected. There is no difference in the number of women and men who completed teacher
training (34%). But while 14% of junior male scholars did not pass training despite of having an
opportunity, only 5% of female informants wasted this opportunity. Male and female
respondents had identical perception about the usefulness of the training they attended. But
conforming to the trend above, more female political scientists regretted the fact that they had
not attended any training (71% as opposed to 62% of males). Various explanations are possible.
To name a few, it may be that more women plan to remain in academia than their male
colleagues, therefore, they see training as more vital for their future career. However, there were
no difference in the career plans of male and female respondents 49% of men and 50% of
women respondents imagine their future within academia.
Another possible explanation is that women may consider themselves disadvantaged in the
male-dominated academic labor market. That is, they wish to increase their qualifications.
Unfortunately, our evidence with respect to this issue is scant as we did not ask respondents to
evaluate the usefulness of such qualifications on their chances of getting an academic job.
13


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