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Teaching Experience and Teacher-Training Needs of Young Political Scientists
Unformatted Document Text:  which is not surprising. But the fact that men rank emotive issues (emotional preparation and peer support in discussing teaching experience) higher than women is a rather unexpected finding. Again, supporting our expectations, PhD students and those who plan to pursue an academic career mention a much greater number of teaching problems than PhD degree holders and those with non-academic career plans, respectively (86% vs. 14% and 83% vs. 17%). While grading is a top problem for both doctoral students and young professors, the former are more concerned with course design. This latter finding is understandable inasmuch as many doctoral students do not teach their own courses, but work on the basis of preset syllabi, thus have little experience in making them. As a professor, one must gain the skill of putting together a syllabus early on. Expectations are also supported when we examine problems in light of future plans: future academics are more concerned with course design than those with a non-academic career in mind. Somewhat surprisingly the latter group yearns more for emotional preparedness. When respondents evaluated the benefits of the training they attended, they most often mentioned teaching methods with the emotional side of teaching and practical tips ranking third and second. When it comes to practical tips, respondents seek advice on how to cope with key challenges in the classroom, i.e. structuring a course, supervising and conducting tutorials, grading and disciplining students, using interactive teaching techniques, teaching students with different abilities, etc. Moreover, training is also praised for insights on time management, teaching groups with different numbers of students, and teacher-student interaction. Responses are also informative of what kind of training is preferred. First, respondents value the opportunity to discuss their problems with other colleagues of the same staff category in the course of training. Simulation of teaching and discussion and evaluation of mock teaching 20

Authors: Simon, Eszter. and Pleschova, Gabriela.
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which is not surprising. But the fact that men rank emotive issues (emotional preparation and
peer support in discussing teaching experience) higher than women is a rather unexpected
finding.
Again, supporting our expectations, PhD students and those who plan to pursue an
academic career mention a much greater number of teaching problems than PhD degree holders
and those with non-academic career plans, respectively (86% vs. 14% and 83% vs. 17%). While
grading is a top problem for both doctoral students and young professors, the former are more
concerned with course design. This latter finding is understandable inasmuch as many doctoral
students do not teach their own courses, but work on the basis of preset syllabi, thus have little
experience in making them. As a professor, one must gain the skill of putting together a syllabus
early on. Expectations are also supported when we examine problems in light of future plans:
future academics are more concerned with course design than those with a non-academic career
in mind. Somewhat surprisingly the latter group yearns more for emotional preparedness.
When respondents evaluated the benefits of the training they attended, they most often
mentioned teaching methods with the emotional side of teaching and practical tips ranking third
and second. When it comes to practical tips, respondents seek advice on how to cope with key
challenges in the classroom, i.e. structuring a course, supervising and conducting tutorials,
grading and disciplining students, using interactive teaching techniques, teaching students with
different abilities, etc. Moreover, training is also praised for insights on time management,
teaching groups with different numbers of students, and teacher-student interaction.
Responses are also informative of what kind of training is preferred. First, respondents
value the opportunity to discuss their problems with other colleagues of the same staff category
in the course of training. Simulation of teaching and discussion and evaluation of mock teaching
20


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