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Who produces the great teachers? Evaluating graduate political science programs via teaching awards
Unformatted Document Text:  Methodology and data Rankings of graduate programs by Matsuoka et al (2007b), and McCormick and Rice (2001) use recipients of PhDs from those programs in order to rank the programs. Per McCormick and Rice, “departments gain a reputation not only by the scholarly output of their faculty but also by the students they produce. Focusing upon departmental graduates is especially important since tight job markets often compel potentially productive scholars to take positions in less prestigious departments.” (McCormick and Rice, 2001: 675) 1 In order to ascertain which political science Ph.D. programs are most effective at producing good teachers, we constructed an original data set based on the teaching awards reported in each issue of PS: Political Science and Politics and PS was examined using JSTOR for the years covered 1968-2003. The “News and Notes” (1968 through Summer 1981), and “People in Political Science” (Autumn 1981 through 2003) sections included announcements of Teaching Awards and this constituted our basic resource. Although it might be argued the reported teaching awards does not constitute and exhaustive list of teaching awards given to political science faculty, we believe that there are two advantages of using this as our primary data source. First, this was the primary venue for reporting achievements of Political Science faculty to the broader discipline. Whatever a department considered important, was reported in PS in order to showcase a major achievement. 2 Second, this represents the only systematic source of data for teaching awards across the discipline. 1 Given this statement, it seems all the more important for potential hiring departments to have some idea of which programs produce good teachers given the flood of PhD recipients to less prestigious—or primarily teaching—departments. 2 As a side note, this also suggests that the Political Science Departments reporting these teaching Awards also value teaching. 5

Authors: Ishiyama, John. and Cole, Alexandra.
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Methodology and data
Rankings of graduate programs by Matsuoka et al (2007b), and McCormick and
Rice (2001) use recipients of PhDs from those programs in order to rank the programs.
Per McCormick and Rice, “departments gain a reputation not only by the scholarly output
of their faculty but also by the students they produce. Focusing upon departmental
graduates is especially important since tight job markets often compel potentially
productive scholars to take positions in less prestigious departments.” (McCormick and
Rice, 2001: 675)
In order to ascertain which political science Ph.D. programs are most
effective at producing good teachers, we constructed an original data set based on the
teaching awards reported in each issue of PS: Political Science and Politics and PS was
examined using JSTOR for the years covered 1968-2003. The “News and Notes” (1968
through Summer 1981), and “People in Political Science” (Autumn 1981 through 2003)
sections included announcements of Teaching Awards and this constituted our basic
resource. Although it might be argued the reported teaching awards does not constitute
and exhaustive list of teaching awards given to political science faculty, we believe that
there are two advantages of using this as our primary data source. First, this was the
primary venue for reporting achievements of Political Science faculty to the broader
discipline. Whatever a department considered important, was reported in PS in order to
showcase a major achievement.
Second, this represents the only systematic source of
data for teaching awards across the discipline.
1
Given this statement, it seems all the more important for potential hiring departments to have some idea of
which programs produce good teachers given the flood of PhD recipients to less prestigious—or primarily
teaching—departments.
2
As a side note, this also suggests that the Political Science Departments reporting these teaching Awards
also value teaching.
5


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