All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Buzzwords, jargon, both or neither? Collaboration and interdisciplinarity in graduate education
Unformatted Document Text:  environmental studies 5  students who emphasized policy, one environmental engineer, three journalists,  one geoscientist, two biologists, and one business student.  With lessons learned from Cohort 1, the faculty recognized that group dynamics required much more attention early in the collaboration process and so cohort 2 quickly adopted a rotating leadership role.  Further, the selection process for participants in cohort 2 was more focused.  Rather than simply having participating faculty nominate who they considered their best students, PIs took an active role ensuring that students had the desire to participate on an interdisciplinary project and that at least some of the students had relevant experience and expertise working with and leading groups of people.   Like cohort 1, cohort 2 was encouraged to participate in mini‐internships.  For example, a  geoscientist brought a journalist and a political scientist to Iceland to study and write about climate change in the Arctic.  Also, like cohort 1, cohort 2 was allowed to struggle with defining its project, with the intention that they would complete that project in year 2.  Like cohort 1, faculty guidance was ultimately required to settle on cohort 2’s project, which was to prepare an interdisciplinary course for undergraduates covering the many aspects of climate change.  The students also taught the course, and so cohort 2’s tenure was extended to 3 years so that participants could dedicate 3 semesters to course development and one semester to teaching the course.  During cohort 2’s third year, the authors became participant‐observers of cohort 2, which largely consisted of participating in cohort 2’s meetings and reviewing the materials they were developing for their course.   C HALLENGES OF  I NTERDISCIPLINARY  G RADUATE  E DUCATION     Over the course of CCSI, each cohort faced its own set of challenges and rewards.  In the  following section, we highlight some of the major problems of collaboration, of interdisciplinarity and problems which exist at the intersection of collaborative, interdisciplinary education.  We first review these challenges as they exist in the literature, then as they existed for us.  Our analysis is based on our participation, observation and interviews with CCSI participants.   C HALLENGES OF  C OLLABORATION     In many ways, internal dynamics are one of the most critical components of interdisciplinary  research.  They can govern the development of shared visions, as well as serve as a valuable indicator of personal satisfaction and evaluation of the project.  Most of these challenges are related to the dynamics of any group of people working together.  Thus, they draw heavily from the general literatures on team work and organizational dynamics.    C OMMON  L ANGUAGE ,   M EANING ,  AND  C OMMUNICATION   Interdisciplinary teams typically undertake complex problems.  These problems, typically, cross  disciplines and therefore require that researchers be able to speak to and understand each other.  As Senge notes, “without a shared language for dealing with complexity, team learning is limited” (Senge 1990; 268).   The ideal situation occurs when an interdisciplinary research group develops a common                                                                     5  During time between the start of cohort 1 and cohort 2, the University of Colorado, Boulder, began a  graduate program in Environmental Studies. 

Authors: Lowham, Elizabeth. and Schilla, Annalisa.
first   previous   Page 6 of 15   next   last



background image
environmental studies
5
 students who emphasized policy, one environmental engineer, three journalists, 
one geoscientist, two biologists, and one business student.  With lessons learned from Cohort 1, the 
faculty recognized that group dynamics required much more attention early in the collaboration process 
and so cohort 2 quickly adopted a rotating leadership role.  Further, the selection process for participants 
in cohort 2 was more focused.  Rather than simply having participating faculty nominate who they 
considered their best students, PIs took an active role ensuring that students had the desire to participate 
on an interdisciplinary project and that at least some of the students had relevant experience and 
expertise working with and leading groups of people. 
 
Like cohort 1, cohort 2 was encouraged to participate in mini‐internships.  For example, a 
geoscientist brought a journalist and a political scientist to Iceland to study and write about climate 
change in the Arctic.  Also, like cohort 1, cohort 2 was allowed to struggle with defining its project, with 
the intention that they would complete that project in year 2.  Like cohort 1, faculty guidance was 
ultimately required to settle on cohort 2’s project, which was to prepare an interdisciplinary course for 
undergraduates covering the many aspects of climate change.  The students also taught the course, and 
so cohort 2’s tenure was extended to 3 years so that participants could dedicate 3 semesters to course 
development and one semester to teaching the course.  During cohort 2’s third year, the authors became 
participant‐observers of cohort 2, which largely consisted of participating in cohort 2’s meetings and 
reviewing the materials they were developing for their course.  
C
HALLENGES OF 
I
NTERDISCIPLINARY 
G
RADUATE 
E
DUCATION
 
 
Over the course of CCSI, each cohort faced its own set of challenges and rewards.  In the 
following section, we highlight some of the major problems of collaboration, of interdisciplinarity and 
problems which exist at the intersection of collaborative, interdisciplinary education.  We first review 
these challenges as they exist in the literature, then as they existed for us.  Our analysis is based on our 
participation, observation and interviews with CCSI participants. 
 
C
HALLENGES OF 
C
OLLABORATION
 
 
In many ways, internal dynamics are one of the most critical components of interdisciplinary 
research.  They can govern the development of shared visions, as well as serve as a valuable indicator of 
personal satisfaction and evaluation of the project.  Most of these challenges are related to the dynamics 
of any group of people working together.  Thus, they draw heavily from the general literatures on team 
work and organizational dynamics. 
 
C
OMMON 
L
ANGUAGE
,
 
M
EANING
,
 AND 
C
OMMUNICATION
 
Interdisciplinary teams typically undertake complex problems.  These problems, typically, cross 
disciplines and therefore require that researchers be able to speak to and understand each other.  As 
Senge notes, “without a shared language for dealing with complexity, team learning is limited” (Senge 
1990; 268).   The ideal situation occurs when an interdisciplinary research group develops a common 
                                                                  
5
 During time between the start of cohort 1 and cohort 2, the University of Colorado, Boulder, began a 
graduate program in Environmental Studies. 


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 15   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.