All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Empathy, Prejudice and Fostering Tolerance
Unformatted Document Text:  provided time to get to know and trust the professor and other students, and was closely related to the students’  assessing the class an open, safe and diverse environment that fostered candid communication and difficult  dialogues. As a consequence of this context and the work carried out, students felt they gained a larger  understanding of the nature of prejudice and discrimination, a deeper appreciation and interest for the others and  an awareness of the fact that although different, we all are human beings, with the same “goals, dreams and fears”  (Shoshona). However, their opinion regarding the IATs was negative in general. Most students considered the  IATs biased and therefore, not an accurate measure of their own attitudes. But since the majority of the students  also claimed to be free of any initial kind of prejudice, one conclusion may be that the students were – not  surprisingly – simply uncomfortable being told they held implicit prejudice.    CONCLUSION This paper presents results from a class that used a narrative interview technique to foster empathic  involvement with “the other,” in the hope that such involvement would foster more tolerant attitudes and  compassionate treatment of others.  Students in the class were tested for their attitudes toward diverse groups,  both before and after the class intervention, using verbal and written assessments and implicit association tests of  tolerance toward these various groups. Results were compared with similar tests for a control group, obtained  through a respondent­driven nominee sample. Since our intervention focused on the elderly, we expected a shift in  attitudes toward old people. Here we found mixed results.  Students’ verbal and written assessment of their overall  attitudes toward the elderly suggested a change, but the IAT results showed no statistically meaningful change in  attitudes toward old people. This gap between the students’ qualitative assessment of their overall attitudes toward  the elderly and the quantitative measure (IAT) may be due to the effect of power dynamics in the classroom. In  17

Authors: Monroe, Kristen.
first   previous   Page 17 of 22   next   last



background image
provided time to get to know and trust the professor and other students, and was closely related to the students’ 
assessing the class an open, safe and diverse environment that fostered candid communication and difficult 
dialogues. As a consequence of this context and the work carried out, students felt they gained a larger 
understanding of the nature of prejudice and discrimination, a deeper appreciation and interest for the others and 
an awareness of the fact that although different, we all are human beings, with the same “goals, dreams and fears” 
(Shoshona). However, their opinion regarding the IATs was negative in general. Most students considered the 
IATs biased and therefore, not an accurate measure of their own attitudes. But since the majority of the students 
also claimed to be free of any initial kind of prejudice, one conclusion may be that the students were – not 
surprisingly – simply uncomfortable being told they held implicit prejudice.   
CONCLUSION
This paper presents results from a class that used a narrative interview technique to foster empathic 
involvement with “the other,” in the hope that such involvement would foster more tolerant attitudes and 
compassionate treatment of others.  Students in the class were tested for their attitudes toward diverse groups, 
both before and after the class intervention, using verbal and written assessments and implicit association tests of 
tolerance toward these various groups. Results were compared with similar tests for a control group, obtained 
through a respondent­driven nominee sample. Since our intervention focused on the elderly, we expected a shift in 
attitudes toward old people. Here we found mixed results.  Students’ verbal and written assessment of their overall 
attitudes toward the elderly suggested a change, but the IAT results showed no statistically meaningful change in 
attitudes toward old people. This gap between the students’ qualitative assessment of their overall attitudes toward 
the elderly and the quantitative measure (IAT) may be due to the effect of power dynamics in the classroom. In 
17


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 17 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.