All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Empathy, Prejudice and Fostering Tolerance
Unformatted Document Text:  1  We define politics to include normative concerns. 2  In 2005, the 20,061 undergraduates at UCI identified themselves as Asian (49 %), African American (2 %), Chicano (12 %),  Caucasian (26 %), other (8 %), and foreign (2 percent). Other statistics are not available. 3  This kind of contrast is evident in many areas, including immigration: For example, survey questions ask:” Will immigrants steal  American jobs or enrich OUR economy?”  4 ## email not listed ## 5  In methodological terms, how do we interpret the negative student comments regarding the IAT tests? How reliable are they?  It is possible that students may have rejected the IAT results because of their denial of being prejudiced people.  Another  possibility is that in actuality the IATs have not captured their real attitudes. We found a few studies evaluating the reliability of  some specific IAT tests, but there is no definitive evidence on the IATs’ reliability (Cunningham, Preacher and Banaji 2001).  One way to address these considerations in future work is to include a test­retest of the IATs.  Analysts also might include a  social desirability scale to control the possible tendency of students to show themselves as not having any prejudice. Scales  such as the Paulhus Deception Scales (Paulhus, 1998) measure both self deception and impression management. “Self­ deception” represents an unconscious process to deny psychologically threatening thoughts and feelings reflective of  psychoanalytic conflicts, and “other­deception” represents conscious distortion toward self­enhancement. Certain other  methodological aspects of the study could be improved in future tests of our experiment. For example, to increase the  statistical reliability of results and obtain more robust findings, future experimental courses could increase the number of  students. While still keeping the seminar format necessary to facilitate class dialogue, the course could be expanded to 40  students. All students would meet once a week with the professor and TA for a lecture and discussion. The course could then  be broken into two smaller groups, for more intense discussion of 20 students and the faculty. Each of these groups would then 

Authors: Monroe, Kristen.
first   previous   Page 20 of 22   next   last



background image
1
 We define politics to include normative concerns.
2
 In 2005, the 20,061 undergraduates at UCI identified themselves as Asian (49 %), African American (2 %), Chicano (12 %), 
Caucasian (26 %), other (8 %), and foreign (2 percent). Other statistics are not available.
3
 This kind of contrast is evident in many areas, including immigration: For example, survey questions ask:” Will immigrants steal 
American jobs or enrich OUR economy?” 
4
## email not listed ##
5
 In methodological terms, how do we interpret the negative student comments regarding the IAT tests? How reliable are they? 
It is possible that students may have rejected the IAT results because of their denial of being prejudiced people.  Another 
possibility is that in actuality the IATs have not captured their real attitudes. We found a few studies evaluating the reliability of 
some specific IAT tests, but there is no definitive evidence on the IATs’ reliability (Cunningham, Preacher and Banaji 2001). 
One way to address these considerations in future work is to include a test­retest of the IATs.  Analysts also might include a 
social desirability scale to control the possible tendency of students to show themselves as not having any prejudice. Scales 
such as the Paulhus Deception Scales (Paulhus, 1998) measure both self deception and impression management. “Self­
deception” represents an unconscious process to deny psychologically threatening thoughts and feelings reflective of 
psychoanalytic conflicts, and “other­deception” represents conscious distortion toward self­enhancement. Certain other 
methodological aspects of the study could be improved in future tests of our experiment. For example, to increase the 
statistical reliability of results and obtain more robust findings, future experimental courses could increase the number of 
students. While still keeping the seminar format necessary to facilitate class dialogue, the course could be expanded to 40 
students. All students would meet once a week with the professor and TA for a lecture and discussion. The course could then 
be broken into two smaller groups, for more intense discussion of 20 students and the faculty. Each of these groups would then 


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.