All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Empathy, Prejudice and Fostering Tolerance
Unformatted Document Text:  conclusion discusses the limitations in the experiment. While we note the need to expand and refine the program,  overall, we found the experimental course offers a useful tool for scholars concerned with group identity, prejudice,  and tolerance. 1. PHILOSOPHICAL, PEDAGOGICAL, AND THEORETICAL PSYCHOLOGICAL PREMISES.  We adopted three underlying philosophical premises that distinguish this course experiment from the more  traditional treatment of differences. (1) Differences exist. It is not the existence of a difference that is critical  politically but rather the ethical significance that is accorded to the difference. (2) The ethical salience of a  difference is socially constructed. There is no inherent reason why one difference – race or religion – should be  politically significant when other differences – musical ability or weight – are not politically relevant. (3) The key to  understanding the politics of difference is to think of cultural differences not as intrinsic and immutable but rather as  the result of how differences are shaped and perceived – by one’s self and by others – through a cognitive  classification of one’s self and of one’s self in relation to others. Our treatment of others thus results not from a  rational calculus of interests that flows naturally from innately derived and immutable differences – such as race,  gender or ethnicity – but rather from our perceptions of others as derived from the moral salience accorded these  differences via a cognitive categorization and classification of others in relation to ourselves (Monroe 1996, 2004). Pedagogically, we assumed: (1) Students learn best not by listening to lectures but by being forced to  examine their own preconceptions in the light of empirical evidence. (2) Emotions play an important part in  permanent shifts in attitudes, hence, we emphasized narrative interviews designed to tap into emotional ties  (McGaugh 2003). 3

Authors: Monroe, Kristen.
first   previous   Page 3 of 22   next   last



background image
conclusion discusses the limitations in the experiment. While we note the need to expand and refine the program, 
overall, we found the experimental course offers a useful tool for scholars concerned with group identity, prejudice, 
and tolerance.
1. PHILOSOPHICAL, PEDAGOGICAL, AND THEORETICAL PSYCHOLOGICAL PREMISES
We adopted three underlying philosophical premises that distinguish this course experiment from the more 
traditional treatment of differences. (1) Differences exist. It is not the existence of a difference that is critical 
politically but rather the ethical significance that is accorded to the difference. (2) The ethical salience of a 
difference is socially constructed. There is no inherent reason why one difference – race or religion – should be 
politically significant when other differences – musical ability or weight – are not politically relevant. (3) The key to 
understanding the politics of difference is to think of cultural differences not as intrinsic and immutable but rather as 
the result of how differences are shaped and perceived – by one’s self and by others – through a cognitive 
classification of one’s self and of one’s self in relation to others. Our treatment of others thus results not from a 
rational calculus of interests that flows naturally from innately derived and immutable differences – such as race, 
gender or ethnicity – but rather from our perceptions of others as derived from the moral salience accorded these 
differences via a cognitive categorization and classification of others in relation to ourselves (Monroe 1996, 2004).
Pedagogically, we assumed: (1) Students learn best not by listening to lectures but by being forced to 
examine their own preconceptions in the light of empirical evidence. (2) Emotions play an important part in 
permanent shifts in attitudes, hence, we emphasized narrative interviews designed to tap into emotional ties 
(McGaugh 2003).
3


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 22   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.